Banking Sector Leads In Global Data Leakage – Infowatch Report

Data Leakage The banking and financial services industry is at high risk for data leakage with over 40 per cent of leaked personal data globally, according to the Infowatch Global Data Leakage Report 2014.

Infowatch Group is the global leader in data leakage protection solutions.

Its Chief Executive Officer, Natalya Kaspersky, said the industry was involved in the leakage of 313 million personal data attributed to 135 cases reported last year.

“Although healthcare segment recorded a higher number of cases, the personal data compromised were much lower in volume compared to the banking and finance sector at 58 million,” she said during her presentation via webinar today.

She said the type of data breached was led by information breach, followed by data fraud and exceeding access rights.

The way data was being leaked was also changing, she said, from the traditional paper or hard copy to a more sophisticated way through browsers and cloud.

Kaspersky said data leakage might soon overtake other threats when it comes to financial and reputation damage to an organisation.

“It is the consumers which are being put at risk when organisations did not put enough precautions to prevent leaks, as the report revealed that 92 per cent of information leaked are personal data,” she added.

Meanwhile, Infowatch Asia Pacific/Malaysia Regional Head, Renga Nathan, said the awareness on the importance of data leakage protection in Malaysia was still very low probably due to the lack of enforcement in terms of Personal Data Protection Act.

“In Malaysia, the penetration of such solutions is only about ten per cent, while in the banking sector only 30 per cent have that kind of protection,” he said.

However, there has been an increasing awareness whereby more organisations are now putting in more budget allocations to extend their data protection to leakage solutions.


SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.bernama.com.my/

Is It Time to Review Your Data Monitoring Policy?

computer data monitoringThe relationship between workers, their devices and company material can be hazardous if left unmonitored.

Did your employer review their BYOD or employee monitoring policies with you during your onboarding process? Or, has your company’s leadership team made any changes to their policy as cellphones and other mobile devices have been allowed access to company email and files?

As more mobile devices enter the workplace, employers have started extending their data monitoring policies to worker’s personal technology. Although employee monitoring is not a new concept and is often expected in the office, there is a strong aversion to cellphone monitoring, especially among millennials.

Need for Education

According to a nationwide study by TechnologyAdvice Research, more than a third of office workers don’t know their employers’ data monitoring policies.

“The responses suggest a need for greater transparency or education efforts among company management about monitoring policies in order to keep employees engaged and maintain trust in company policies and values,” said TechnologyAdvice Managing Editor Cameron Graham, the study’s author. About 20 percent of respondents were unaware of whether their activity was monitored, while 15.6 percent were aware that their computer use was monitored somehow, but were unsure of the specifics.

Employee Sentiment on Being Monitored

There is a major split in how employees feel about computer monitoring as opposed to mobile device monitoring in the workplace. “Employees seem fairly comfortable in general with employers tracking their computer use at work, considering only 19 percent of respondents said they often or sometimes worry about their employer viewing their Internet history,” said Graham.

But 64.3 percent of office employees stated they would be at least somewhat uncomfortable with their cellphone being monitored during work hours. This is especially true for millennial respondents, who reported being more uncomfortable with cellphone monitoring, but were also found to be less likely to know how they were being monitored.

“There is a clear concern when it comes to employers tracking cellphone use, which respondents viewed as a greater concern than keylogging software or video surveillance,” Graham said. “That fear of cellphone monitoring doesn’t seem to be based on negative experiences, though, with roughly just 1 in 20 employees saying they’ve been questioned about such use.”

BYOD Policy Concerns

Millennials are poised to make up 44 percent of the work population by 2025, yet are the least likely to know the details of employee monitoring policies, despite expressing more concern about mobile device privacy than other age group. As this younger demographic moves into the workforce, employers will likely face growing challenges over Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policies and mobile device monitoring.

“Involving all relevant parties in policy creation could help ease concerns over monitoring, and strike a balance in maintaining control over company information while discouraging insecure device use,” said Graham.


Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.datamation.com/

5 IT Shortcuts That Put Your Company’s Data at Risk

computers
IT departments looking to save time and money shouldn’t be doing so at the expense of their data protection. A study from the University of Texas revealed that 43% of companies suffering from catastrophic data loss close and never reopen, and 51% close within two years.

Backup solutions provider Unitrends warns IT professionals about five common data protection shortcuts that could put their company’s data — and even their jobs — at risk.

Ignoring Hardware Failures

Hardware failures are the leading cause of data loss. Though most IT professionals don’t completely disregard hardware that is failing to back up company data and systems, many do often ignore the fact that certain backup mediums have high failure rates, such as tape or a SAN or NAS storage device that is used as both the source and target of a backup. To reduce the risk of hardware failures, move data from primary storage to a separate, secondary storage device. Disk-to-disk backup is the best approach, as it’s more reliable than tape and still ensures a physically separate secondary storage set that can survive hardware and system failures.

Trusting Co-workers to Follow Policies

The reality is that employees aren’t always great at following company policies, and even when they do, mistakes still happen. The best defenses against human error are automation and retention. Automation enables automatic execution and strict enforcement of created policies and procedures, and retention enables data recovery, regardless of whether the data loss is noticed right away or weeks later.

Underestimating Cybercriminals

By now, most companies have at least basic security solutions, such as firewalls and anti-virus software, in place to defend against malware. But cybercriminals are becoming very adept at breaking through traditional cyberdefenses. IT professionals should evaluate their infrastructure, identify areas of vulnerability and implement advanced security solutions to overcome them. These solutions include web monitoring software for safe Internet usage, end-point protection for bring-your-own-device management and a sandbox to fight targeted attacks. From a backup perspective, the best approach is to operate backup and disaster-recovery solutions on a non-Windows operating system. Windows has long been one of cybercriminals’ favorite targets, and running protection software on an operating system that is relentlessly under attack just doesn’t make sense.

Playing the Odds

Despite data-loss horror stories, many companies still don’t have disaster-recovery plans in place to protect information from natural and man-made disasters. And many of the companies that do have set plans have just one general set of guidelines that apply to all disaster situations. A strong plan focuses on people, infrastructure and processes, and clearly outlines how each is affected in different disaster scenarios.

Failing to Test Disaster-Recovery Plans

Failure to test disaster-recovery plans, or testing them on an infrequent basis, can greatly increase the risk of data loss in the event of a disaster. Since IT infrastructure evolves daily, thorough testing must be done on a consistent schedule that allows it to be adopted as yet another standard business practice.


Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://mashable.com/

Report: Netflix and YouTube Account for Half of Internet’s Traffic

Netflix and YouTube dominate over half of downstream Internet traffic in North America, according to a new report released by Canadian Internet monitoring firm Sandvine.

Traffic Source

Downstream traffic is data that goes from a source to a computer, and Netflix’s share of that is 31.6%. YouTube comes in second at about 18.7%, up 9% from the first half of this year.

The increased dominance of streaming services has also lessened the impact of peer-to-peer traffic and video piracy. BitTorrent accounts for around 4% of North American downstream Internet traffic, compared with 31% five years ago.

Statista‘s chart, which uses data from Sandvine’s Global Internet Phenomena Report, shows which shares of U.S. downstream web traffic can be attributed to different properties.

The mobile numbers from Sandvine’s report tell a bit of a different story. YouTube controls the largest portion of data, at nearly 17.7%. Facebook follows in a close second, about 2% behind.


Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://mashable.com/

5 super easy tips for better online security on Safer Internet Day

It’s Safer Internet Day! Every February 10, the occasion is meant to be a reminder — particularly to young people — of the perils of the Internet.

Internet Security

The hope is to encourage more responsibility when we use the Internet and mobile technology. That can mean a lot of things and can be as simple as being more respectful online.

But it’s also a reminder to better protect yourself and your personal information. Google, for example, is using the day to remind people about the importance of online security. Coincidentally, the U.S. government happened to announce a new government agency completely dedicated to combating cyberthreats on Tuesday.

Of course, it’s always a good time to remind people that it’s easier and perhaps more common than ever before to fall victim to online attackers and cybersecurity risks. Every person should be taking measures to stay safer online. Before your eyes glaze, we have some very easy things that anyone can do to protect themselves online.

1. Use two-factor authentication

With two-factor authentication, users have to provide, in addition to a typical password, a one-time code when using a log-in service. In most cases, the code is sent to your phone — in a text message, for example. So after entering your password, you then have to put in what’s basically a one-time second password.

Based on your preferences, two-factor authentication can occur every time you log in to something or only occasionally, like when logging into an account on a new device.

Many major websites offer two-factor confirmations. Google was among the first. But now a bevy of them — including Apple’s iCloud, Dropbox, Microsoft, Twitter and Facebook — offer some form of login approval.

It might seem simple, but just a smidgen of time can almost double password security.

2. Update your browser and devices!

Browsers, operating systems and mobile devices often need updates. Sure, this can be a pain, but it’s important. Many times, updates are intended to patch just-now-discovered security problems.

Researchers are constantly finding new security holes that cyberattackers can exploit. So if an update notice comes through, never hesitate. It could be the difference between losing 15 minutes of your time and a hacker gaining control of your computer.

3. Use unique passwords and a password manager

People are really bad at making strong passwords. In 2014, the most common leaked passwords were “123456” and “password.” It’s also typical for people to include their birth year (especially those born between 1989 and 1992) in their passwords.

Hackers are up to your tricks. For each login, each website, each service, you should be using unique passwords that have nothing to do with a dead pet or your birthday. “But how do I remember all these passwords?” you might be asking. Well, you don’t have to.

There are a number of good password management services, such as LastPass or 1Password, that can generate and store login information in a virtual vault. Some even offer security-checking features that will let you know if you have duplicate or weak passwords.

4. Get a Google security checkup

Google is offering Drive users an extra 2GB of storage space if they take part in its Security Checkup program by Feb. 17. It takes a few minutes to run some quick tests on your Google accounts. To get started, click here.

The feature offers an overview of your recent sign-in activity (to see if any unusual devices are logging into your accounts). With the checkup, users can also grant and revoke account permissions on their devices, as well as add recovery information — such as a phone number — to help Google get in touch if something is up with your accounts.

5. Use HTTPS whenever you can

HTTPS is the secure version of hypertext transfer protocol — the letters that come before the “www.” in a web address. That last “S” can provide a big difference, however. HTTPS works to bidirectionally encrypt information sent between you and a website’s servers.

It isn’t perfect. HTTPS will not protect you from, say, government surveillance, but it can be surprisingly sophisticated in its protections. BMW, for example, failed to use HTTPS when transmitting data via its ConnectedDrive car system. That made the car vulnerable to remote hackers, who could have exploited that oversight to open car doors.

Most major websites are compatible with HTTPS, but it is best to be cognizant of the web addresses you’re using. There are tools, too, such as HTTPS Everywhere browser extension, that works to automatically switch any HTTP address over to HTTPS.


Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://mashable.com/

11 free tools to protect your online activity from surveillance

Privacy Key

The documentary Citizenfour, which debuted to a limited release on Friday, offers the closest look yet at Edward Snowden, the whistleblower who exposed the National Security Agency spying scandal. In the film, Snowden and the journalists he works with go to great lengths to shield their correspondence from unwanted eyes.

Though Laura Poitras’ film explores a very extreme circumstance — a massive leak of top-secret information to the press — it’s as good a reminder as any that we live in a time of widespread government surveillance, and you can’t be sure who’s intruding on or monitoring your Internet activity and communications.

You might want more privacy online for any number of reasons — you could be a journalist reporting on a sensitive topic, like Poitras and Glenn Greenwald, or you might just want more peace of mind in light of the NSA revelations. To better protect yourself, here are 11 tools (presented in no particular order) to help you encrypt data, block intrusive trackers or remain altogether anonymous on the web. Note that this is by no means an exhaustive list of what’s out there, and no security measure is 100% effective. All of the tools listed here are free.

1. Tor Project

Tor is a free software program that allows people to use web connections anonymously. Widely considered to be one of the best privacy tools on the web, Tor can be downloaded as a software package, and there’s a Tor-enabled browser available. It’s difficult to track information that passes through Tor — so much so that Russian President Vladimir Putin has put up a $110,000 reward for anyone who can crack its secrets.

Where to get it: Direct download

2. The Guardian Project

The Guardian Project creates open-source apps to help people communicate privately. All of the group’s software is downloadable for free for Android smartphones. For secure web browsing, there’s a privacy-friendly browser called Orweb that works with a Tor-enabled proxy called Orbot for mobile. There’s also a private messaging service called ChatSecure, an app for private phone calls and a pixel-destroying camera tool to blur faces in photos. This project is almost worth a list all its own.

Where to get them: Google Play, Amazon or direct download

3. DuckDuckGo

Duckduckgo

IMAGE: DUCKDUCKGO

DuckDuckGo is a search engine that doesn’t track or share any of your information. If you’re looking for better privacy, use this over Google.

Where to use it: Duckduckgo.com

4. HTTPS Everywhere

When you’re browsing the web, you’ll notice that URLs typically have the “http://” prefix, if not the more secure version: “https://” (HTTP Secure). The HTTPS Everywhere browser plugin works with Chrome, Firefox and Opera, and it attempts to automatically switch any HTTP web address over to HTTPS, which encrypts communication between you and the server to protect against eavesdropping or impostors.

Where to get it: Google Play or direct download

5. Ghostery

Ghostery allows you to keep tabs on companies that track your visits to websites. With this browser extension, you can block companies from collecting your browsing data. Ghostery has a popup option that displays a message each time you visit a site with a list of who’s tracking you.

When I visited Amazon.com, for example, Ghostery showed me I was being tracked by these entities:

Amazon Associates

Where to get it: Direct download

6. Privacy Badger

Privacy Badger is a browser extension that can block third-party advertisers, but it has a moral compass. If Privacy Badger suspects a tracker is overstepping its bounds by tracking what you’re doing without your permission, the extension stops the advertiser in its tracks. It’s all based on the principle of user consent: If the advertiser breaks the rules, Privacy Badger cuts the cord.

Where to get it: Direct download

7. GPG

You may have heard of PGP (Pretty Good Privacy), an encryption program developed in the early ’90s to make email conversations more secure. It’s a bit outdated, though. The better option is GPG. The GNU Privacy Guard system allows you to encrypt and sign your data. Each party has a pair of “keys,” one public and one private. The sender, in this case, sends the email to the receiver’s public key, but this encrypted message can only be deciphered if the receiver enters his or her private key (that is known only to them) upon reception of the communication.

Where to get it for Windows: Direct download

Where to get it for Mac: Direct download

8. Cryptocat

Cryptocat is an encrypted chatting service that can be added as a browser extension or downloaded as an app for Mac systems. It is one of the more popular encryption tools available, often used by journalists and human rights advocates. Put simply, only the sender and receiver can see the actual content of the message. When messages are traveling through Cryptocat, they’re unreadable. As a bonus, the application supports file-sharing.

Where to get it: Direct download

9. Wickr

Mashable previously described Wickr as “Snapchat for grownups,” and that’s a good way to put it. Wickr sends photos, video and file attachments that will eventually be deleted, but unlike Snapchat, Wickr encrypts messages. Not even Wickr itself is supposed to know what’s in the messages you send. What you send can last anywhere from a few seconds to several days.

Where to get it: Google Play and the App Store

10. Signal

For phone calls on iPhones, there’s an app called Signal, and it’s probably the best iOS app available for phone call encryption. Open Whisper Systems, the developer behind Signal, has an Android equivalent called RedPhone that provides end-to-end encryption. Eventually, RedPhone will be rolled into Signal to unify the platform, but the apps are already compatible with each other. Snowden himself has praised Open Whisper Systems for their easy-to-use encryption apps.

Where to get Signal: App Store

Where to get RedPhone: Google Play

11. Surveillance Self-Defense Guide

For those of you who are very serious about ramping up your privacy online, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a nonprofit group that advocates for civil rights as they pertain to modern technology, has published an extensive index of security tips and explainers for all sorts of Internet users, be they beginners or experts. It’s a good place to tread a bit deeper into protecting yourself from unwanted surveillance.


Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://mashable.com/