Spy Tools Reviews | SurveilStar Employee Monitoring Software

spy software

The need for computer monitoring tool or spy is very common now. Many parents wish to have something which can keep an eye on their child’s activity while sitting on computer. Many companies CEO’s are worried about their non-committed employees and wish to find out what they do in office time. Well, there indeed are such tools which can spy and record all the activities of your child, employee or student on computer. SurveilStar is a computer monitoring tool which records all the activities of user. It will record everything including chats, emails, applications, files etc. you can see their online activities and much more with the help of SurveilStar. All you have to do is to download it and install it into your computer. It will automatically start working and spying. You don’t have to start or stop it. Not only that you can also restrict many of their activities.

=> Visit the Official Website of SurveilStar

Who uses SurveilStar?

SurveilStar software is for anyone who wishes to know all the activities of people using their PC. It is the best parental control. Parents can see what their children do on internet. They can see the record of websites they visit, read their chats of both sides, read their emails and see the pictures and videos they download. Parents can protect their child from Internet abuse. Also, those who wish to record their employee’s activity can use SurveilStar. See how much time they are giving to your work and how much time are they wasting. Also, you can block some activities for both employees and children. Not only that many internet cafes and school labs can use SurveilStar to protect their computer from misuse.

employee monitoring software

Features

  • Logs everything- all the keystrokes typed are recorded
  • Screen shots- it takes screen snap shots. You can view the whole picture of activities in real time
  • Email- see the emails they send and receive. With every new email receive and send you are notified. Also, you can see the files they attach.
  • Chats/conversation- you can read their chats. All the conversation is recorded. SurveilStar many programs and social networks
  • Website visit- you can see the websites they visit and the keywords they use. Also, you can block the sites you don’t want your child to see
  • Applications- see the applications they open along with the time and user name
  • Network- it records the IP address, network traffic etc. you can limit the speed of internet bandwidth and port.
  • Management- it divides all the users into groups. All the activities are managed in an organized way
  • Password-all the logs are saved in an encrypted file. You can see them via email id and you have password protection.
  • And much more…

Conclusion

SurveilStar is an excellent software and unlike many other software it is more efficient with more great features. SurveilStar can work best for any office, home, school and café. You can easily monitor all the activities through this great monitoring tool.

=> Visit the Official Website of SurveilStar

Big bill revealed for Saanich spying software

Saanich The installation and use of employee monitoring software at Saanich municipal hall could cost the municipality at least $30,000 in 2015, thanks to licensing and maintenance agreements that were confirmed before B.C.’s privacy commissioner launched an investigation into the District’s practices earlier this year.

Emails released Monday through a freedom of information request show Saanich’s Information Technology department underwent training on Nov. 24, 2014 and installed Spector 360 – which is capable of capturing keystrokes as well as continuous screen images of employee activity – on an unknown number of computers at a cost of $1,992.

Two invoices dated Jan. 14, 2015 reveal Saanich was given the option of paying another $29,250 for further licencing and one year of maintenance, or $43,992 for licencing and three years of maintenance by SpectorSoft Corporation, which sells Spector 360. The software had been monitoring activity on several municipal computers until Jan. 20, when the B.C. Privacy Commissioner Elizabeth Denham launched an investigation into its use.

The FOI response also reveals Laura Ciarniello, Saanich’s director of corporate services, sent an email on Dec. 2 to IT manager Forrest Kvemshagen approving the software installation. Mayor Richard Atwell and council were sworn in on Dec. 1.

“I approve of this program and the machines that it has been installed on,” Ciarniello wrote in the email to Kvemshagen. “I have spoken with the Directors and Paul about this and I left it with (former CAO) Paul (Murray) to discuss with [redacted] and [redacted] or not.”

Murray was on vacation leave on Dec. 2 and left the municipality on Dec. 16 with a $468,000 payout. Ciarniello was on vacation Monday and was unavailable for comment.

Mayor Richard Atwell went public about his concerns over the “spyware” on Jan. 12 and said Spector 360 had been installed on his computer and several other computers without his knowledge or consent.

Atwell told the News on Monday that he will wait for the privacy commissioner’s report before commenting on the FOI revelations.

“I will be more than happy to comment when the OIPC releases its findings,” Atwell said.

Interim CAO Andy Laidlaw said the District provided all necessary information to Denham on its use of Spector 360 and will wait to respond to the recommendations in her report.


Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.saanichnews.com/

10 Personal Things Employees Do at Work

Ebenezer Scrooge wasn’t the first employer in history to berate an employee for conducting personal business on company time. And he probably won’t be the last. But personal tasks that may have once been considered taboo are now acceptable practices at work today, says a new study.

Forty-eight percent of bosses in the U.S. don’t mind when employees take longer lunches and are OK with staff getting together to enjoy office banter and to take regular breaks, according to a study of 1,000 U.S., British, German, French and Irish employees and employers sponsored by Mozy, a data protection and backup services provider.

On average, 37% of countries surveyed allow employees to take longer lunch breaks. This new latitude toward employee time management is less a new measure of employer largesse than it is an acknowledgement of how the adoption of mobile technology has made work become “a thing that you do” rather than “a place that you go,” Mozy says.

Employees have been quick to take advantage of this freedom. More than half of employees think nothing of leaving work early for a doctor’s appointment, with nearly one in five eating breakfast at the desk or taking time out to research vacations or shopping.

The study found that these were the top 10 personal tasks that employees felt it was OK to do at work:

  1. Leaving early for the doctor or dentist
  2. Personal phone calls
  3. Regular tea/coffee/watercooler breaks
  4. Chatting with colleagues
  5. Sending a few personal emails
  6. Taking a long lunch
  7. Online banking
  8. Leaving work early for a child’s performance at school
  9. Paying a few bills
  10. Listening to music

Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://mashable.com/

ICYMI: Privacy in the Workplace Webinar

Privacy in the Workplace

Our 2015 monthly Privacy Issues Wednesday webinar series continued this month with Jennifer Rubin and Gauri Punjabi’s Privacy in the Workplace presentation. Jen and Gauri discussed the latest statutory and common law developments concerning employer monitoring of employee email, access to employee social media accounts, social media policies, and bring your own device (“BYOD”) policies.  We were pleased to host over 125 participants for this webinar.

For those missed the webinar, some of the key takeaways for employers include the following:

  • While there is not much federal or state statutory authority on employer monitoring of employee email access, employers are advised to provide employees with prior notice of such monitoring and obtain their consent to do so.
  • Many states now prohibit employers from requesting access to their employees’ or job applicants’ social media accounts. This trend, along with the number of other states that have considered passing similar legislation, suggests that Congress may soon weigh in on this issue.
  • The National Labor Relations Act applies to all employers, regardless of whether the workplace is unionized, and protects employees who use social media to discuss their wages, hours, and other terms and conditions of employment (i.e., concerted activity).  Employers cannot prohibit employees from using work email accounts to have such discussions during non-working time.  Employees will lose the protection of the Act when their actions disparage the employer’s products or services and/or create a risk of harm to the employer or to others.
  • Social media policies should specify the nature of conduct that is permitted and prohibited and should not utilize broad language that could encompass the right of employees to engage in protected concerted activity.  Social media policies should also take into account an employer’s need to protect trade secrets, comply with industry regulations and applicable federal and state employment statutes, and preserve information relevant to litigation.
  • BYOD policies often result in lower employer costs related to device overhead (purchase/maintenance), improve employee productivity, and result in greater employee job satisfaction.  Prior to implementation, however, employers should consider the process for monitoring compliance with other company policies, keeping track of wages owed to non-exempt employees who use their personal devices to work outside of the office, and maintaining the security of company information that ends up on an employee’s personal device and ensuring its removal once the employee leaves the company.

For a recording of the webinar,  click here.   To download the presentation slides, click here.

The next webinar in the Privacy series — Responding to Insider Theft and Data Disclosure — will take place on Wednesday, March 25, 2015.  This webinar will offer practical advice about responding to data theft and disclosures by employees and former employees. We will cover such topics as conducting a proper investigation, utilizing state and local civil court processes to deter, halt, and remediate data thefts, and when and how to engage local and/or federal law enforcement. This webinar will be presented by members of Mintz Levin’s privacy and data security and white collar crime practice groups.


Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.jdsupra.com/

Stop Your Boss From Spying on You

Privacy may be dead, but that doesn’t mean you have to enjoy having your every electronic move tracked by your nosy manager. If you use a company-supplied PC on a corporate network, and you carry around a company smartphone, you’re almost certainly being watched. But with a bit of forethought and some of your own gear, you can enjoy a little digital liberty in the workplace.

At this point, there’s little debate about whether companies have a right to monitor employees’ activities on corporate PCs and networks. If they supply it, they have a responsibility to monitor it. So unless your company is either deeply clueless or naively altruistic, your Web surfing, your instant messages, your running applications, and even your keyboard keystrokes are probably being recorded. And if your boss was generous enough to issue you a smartphone, chances are good that your SMS messages, and possibly even your daily travels, are being tracked as well.
PC Monitoring

In corporate-security speak, the software that monitors what’s happening on your PC falls under the general heading of endpoint security. The term refers to everything that goes on between you and your machine, from how you use your computer to the way the software on it works to the physical location of the system. Your IT department needs to know what’s up with your PC (and you) to make sure the computer doesn’t fall prey to malware, putting company data at risk and potentially harming the business.

Any company with a reasonable IT budget will almost certainly have installed a comprehensive security package from a company such as McAfee, Symantec, or Trend Micro. These suites handle everything from antivirus protection and system update management to corporate policy enforcement, and that last task generally includes keeping logs on which apps you launch, which Websites you visit, and so on. To make matters worse for a privacy-minded employee, a typical endpoint-security suite is tightly integrated not only into the PC’s operating system (with permissions restricted to keep you from meddling with it) but also into the data center, where a server (or possibly a remote host) checks on the PC frequently to make sure everything is okay.

Unless your IT department is using some rinky-dink freeware to monitor you and chronically neglects to check it, disabling the monitoring features on your endpoint-security installation isn’t really an option. Even if you were to succeed, the server-side administration tools would throw a red flag once your system stopped reporting in.

The best way to get around PC monitoring software is to sidestep it entirely by using a PC that only you control. In other words, bring your own laptop. If your boss asks why you’re not using the one Big Brother issued you, say that the keyboard makes your wrists hurt. The mere suggestion of a potential OSHA case may be enough to send your boss ambling down the hall in search of someone else to dump their passive-aggression on. (Just try to steer the conversation away from any suggestion that you hand the machine over to the IT department for any reason.)

Once the boss is out of your hair, install a few sneaky utilities to help you goof off on your PC without getting caught.

Apple iPad 2
If bringing a whole separate PC to work seems over the top to you, take the simpler route: Internet-connected tablets like the iPad or the Motorola Xoom are ideal for stealthy surfing, and they’re unlikely to raise the boss’s eyebrows. In fact, they might even create the impression that you’re ultraproductive, showing the whole office that you take your work seriously enough to bring your own hardware. (Note: Playing Angry Birds on your tablet in front of coworkers all day will likely undermine that impression.)

Or just use your smartphone. (Provided it isn’t a company-issued handset, that is. More on this topic later.)
Network Monitoring

Your work PC is only the first link in a chain of surveillance that extends from your keyboard to basically every other piece of equipment on the corporate network. In some offices, even the copy machine keeps tabs on you. At the very least, all of your network use is likely being logged somewhere. To avoid having your browsing tracked, you need to get off that network.

Thanks to the proliferation of 3G and 4G data services, it has never been easier to enjoy a little semiprivate (nothing is totally private) Web surfing from the office. This development will likely prove to be terrible news for employers, but it’s great for lazy workers who like to goof around on the job.

Overdrive and MiFiThe Sierra Wireless Overdrive (left) and Novatel Wireless MiFi are two great options for surfing the Web without using your company’s network.
You have several good choices for bringing a mobile broadband connection to your PC. You can buy a computer with mobile broadband built in. You can use a USB dongle. You can use a wireless tethering device such as the Novatel Wireless MiFi or the Sierra Wireless Overdrive. Or you can just tether to your personal smartphone. Depending on which option you choose and how much data you plan to eat up, these services will typically set you back between $25 and $80 per month.

If you decide to go the smartphone-tethering route, be sure to keep your phone charging on your desk the whole time. An hour of data tethering will easily blow through your phone’s battery.

Should the expense of your own mobile data service seem unreasonable for the privilege of escaping your boss’s watchful eye, at least take one simple precaution when using your own machine on the company Wi-Fi network: Give your computer an anonymous name.

If you accept the default account settings when you set up your PC, your computer will likely announce you by name whenever you connect to the network, presenting itself as, say, “Dan Thompson’s PC” or similar. This name is usually visible not only to your company’s IT department but also to everyone else on the network–your coworkers, your boss, the woman in accounting, everyone.

Change the name of your PC to something innocuous and nondescript; heck, change it to a random string like 9873r54C. Then nobody will know what it is, and it’ll just blend in with the long list of devices on the network. And more important, if anyone ever does try looking into what it is, what it has been doing on the network, or where it came from, it won’t point so obviously to you.

Even if you’re out of the office, or if you work remotely, your Web activity can still be tracked whenever you connect to the company’s virtual private network. The solution here is simple: Disconnect from the VPN whenever you’re not using it, and stick to work tasks while you are connected. This is good practice anyway, since you have no solid reason to stay connected to the VPN when you don’t need it.
Smartphone

If your company issued you a smartphone, don’t assume that anything you do with it is private. Tracking everything from calls and text messages to apps installed is a trivial task for your IT department, and with mobile security gathering increasing attention of late, chances are good that your device’s network activity is at least showing up in a log somewhere.

Even if you’re not a total slacker, it can be a good practice to carry your own smartphone for personal use. Besides, doing so will give you the advantage of having an untracked device and network connection as mentioned earlier.

In the grand scheme, of course, there’s no such thing as online privacy. And although I know it’s none of my business what you do with your time at work, it actually is–both literally and legally speaking–your boss’s business. So don’t blame the company for wanting to track your computer use. With that said, however, I don’t blame you for wanting to loosen the leash a little from time to time. Just use your best judgment, and don’t get yourself into trouble.

Article Source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/222710/stop_your_boss_from_spying.html