Healthcare finance tips for safeguarding against cyberattacks

cyber-attack caption

Premera hack puts renewed focus on securing sensitive healthcare info.

As Tuesday’s news about the Premera Blue Cross hack shows, healthcare organizations are vulnerable to cyberattacks, and the fix can be costly.

“The average Fortune 500 company budgets $44 million a year for security, including networking and all other aspects,” said Larry Ponemon, chairman of the Ponemon Institute, a research center focused on data security. “(Most) hospitals have less than a million to budget on cyber security.”

Already, at least two class action lawsuits have been brought against insurer Anthem, which saw a major data breach in January affect 80 million people. There’s also the cost to the health plan’s reputation and the logistics of notifying 80 million customers, Ponemon said. It’s still unknown what will come after 11 million people’s information was accesed in the Premera hack.

Until Anthem’s hack in January, high profile security breaches focused on large retailers such as Target and Home Depot.

This doesn’t mean healthcare organizations have been sitting on their hands believing it can’t happen to them, Ponemon said. A  survey of 91 healthcare organizations in 2013 showed that 90 percent experienced at least one data breach that year.

“Even if a hospital is reasonably secure, if may not be enough in this world,” he said.

Medical records are extremely valuable on the black market,  Ponemon said. They contain Social Security numbers, health ID numbers, addresses and possibly credit or debit card information – everything needed to create a fake identity.

“Basically it’s a rich data source for bad guys,” he said, such as terrorists seeking travel credentials.

The hackers may wait months and years before exploiting the data, he said.

“This is where we see the most serious ID theft crimes,” he said. “A lot of the 80 million will become identity theft victims.”

Ponemon was in the intelligence field for 45 years prior to founding the Ponemon Institute 14 years ago.

HITRUST, the Health Information Trust Alliance, works with healthcare organizations to improve their data security. It has partnered with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to conduct monthly briefings on cyber threats relevant to the healthcare industry, and to share best practices for defense and response.

HITRUST offers healthcare organizations a cyber threat alerting system of threats targeted at the industry. The C3 Alert is coordinated with the Healthcare and Public Health Sector and Government Coordinating Councils, according to HITRUST chief executive and founder Daniel Nutkis.

What hospitals can do:

  • As most security breaches are due to human error, maintain a good data structure to prevent data leakage, Ponemon said.
  • Encrypt data. The Wall Street Journal reported Anthem did not encrypt the personal data of its customers.
  • Ban the use of personal devices for storing patient information. Some doctors routinely send clinical records through personal e-mail, their own smartphones or tablets.
  • Rent a network intelligence system instead of buying one, Ponemon advises. It’s secure.
  • Collaborate with partners on exchanging information during and after a cyberattack, according to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s 2014 “Draft Guide to Cyber Threat Information Sharing.” While this may seem counter-intuitive, providers need to  learn the types of systems and information being targeted and the techniques used to gain access.
  • Use standard data formats to facilitate interoperability and fast information exchanges, the NIST recommends.

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  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
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  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

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Reference: http://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/

Banking Sector Leads In Global Data Leakage – Infowatch Report

Data Leakage The banking and financial services industry is at high risk for data leakage with over 40 per cent of leaked personal data globally, according to the Infowatch Global Data Leakage Report 2014.

Infowatch Group is the global leader in data leakage protection solutions.

Its Chief Executive Officer, Natalya Kaspersky, said the industry was involved in the leakage of 313 million personal data attributed to 135 cases reported last year.

“Although healthcare segment recorded a higher number of cases, the personal data compromised were much lower in volume compared to the banking and finance sector at 58 million,” she said during her presentation via webinar today.

She said the type of data breached was led by information breach, followed by data fraud and exceeding access rights.

The way data was being leaked was also changing, she said, from the traditional paper or hard copy to a more sophisticated way through browsers and cloud.

Kaspersky said data leakage might soon overtake other threats when it comes to financial and reputation damage to an organisation.

“It is the consumers which are being put at risk when organisations did not put enough precautions to prevent leaks, as the report revealed that 92 per cent of information leaked are personal data,” she added.

Meanwhile, Infowatch Asia Pacific/Malaysia Regional Head, Renga Nathan, said the awareness on the importance of data leakage protection in Malaysia was still very low probably due to the lack of enforcement in terms of Personal Data Protection Act.

“In Malaysia, the penetration of such solutions is only about ten per cent, while in the banking sector only 30 per cent have that kind of protection,” he said.

However, there has been an increasing awareness whereby more organisations are now putting in more budget allocations to extend their data protection to leakage solutions.


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  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

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Reference: http://www.bernama.com.my/

Is It Time to Review Your Data Monitoring Policy?

computer data monitoringThe relationship between workers, their devices and company material can be hazardous if left unmonitored.

Did your employer review their BYOD or employee monitoring policies with you during your onboarding process? Or, has your company’s leadership team made any changes to their policy as cellphones and other mobile devices have been allowed access to company email and files?

As more mobile devices enter the workplace, employers have started extending their data monitoring policies to worker’s personal technology. Although employee monitoring is not a new concept and is often expected in the office, there is a strong aversion to cellphone monitoring, especially among millennials.

Need for Education

According to a nationwide study by TechnologyAdvice Research, more than a third of office workers don’t know their employers’ data monitoring policies.

“The responses suggest a need for greater transparency or education efforts among company management about monitoring policies in order to keep employees engaged and maintain trust in company policies and values,” said TechnologyAdvice Managing Editor Cameron Graham, the study’s author. About 20 percent of respondents were unaware of whether their activity was monitored, while 15.6 percent were aware that their computer use was monitored somehow, but were unsure of the specifics.

Employee Sentiment on Being Monitored

There is a major split in how employees feel about computer monitoring as opposed to mobile device monitoring in the workplace. “Employees seem fairly comfortable in general with employers tracking their computer use at work, considering only 19 percent of respondents said they often or sometimes worry about their employer viewing their Internet history,” said Graham.

But 64.3 percent of office employees stated they would be at least somewhat uncomfortable with their cellphone being monitored during work hours. This is especially true for millennial respondents, who reported being more uncomfortable with cellphone monitoring, but were also found to be less likely to know how they were being monitored.

“There is a clear concern when it comes to employers tracking cellphone use, which respondents viewed as a greater concern than keylogging software or video surveillance,” Graham said. “That fear of cellphone monitoring doesn’t seem to be based on negative experiences, though, with roughly just 1 in 20 employees saying they’ve been questioned about such use.”

BYOD Policy Concerns

Millennials are poised to make up 44 percent of the work population by 2025, yet are the least likely to know the details of employee monitoring policies, despite expressing more concern about mobile device privacy than other age group. As this younger demographic moves into the workforce, employers will likely face growing challenges over Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policies and mobile device monitoring.

“Involving all relevant parties in policy creation could help ease concerns over monitoring, and strike a balance in maintaining control over company information while discouraging insecure device use,” said Graham.


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SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

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  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.datamation.com/

5 super easy tips for better online security on Safer Internet Day

It’s Safer Internet Day! Every February 10, the occasion is meant to be a reminder — particularly to young people — of the perils of the Internet.

Internet Security

The hope is to encourage more responsibility when we use the Internet and mobile technology. That can mean a lot of things and can be as simple as being more respectful online.

But it’s also a reminder to better protect yourself and your personal information. Google, for example, is using the day to remind people about the importance of online security. Coincidentally, the U.S. government happened to announce a new government agency completely dedicated to combating cyberthreats on Tuesday.

Of course, it’s always a good time to remind people that it’s easier and perhaps more common than ever before to fall victim to online attackers and cybersecurity risks. Every person should be taking measures to stay safer online. Before your eyes glaze, we have some very easy things that anyone can do to protect themselves online.

1. Use two-factor authentication

With two-factor authentication, users have to provide, in addition to a typical password, a one-time code when using a log-in service. In most cases, the code is sent to your phone — in a text message, for example. So after entering your password, you then have to put in what’s basically a one-time second password.

Based on your preferences, two-factor authentication can occur every time you log in to something or only occasionally, like when logging into an account on a new device.

Many major websites offer two-factor confirmations. Google was among the first. But now a bevy of them — including Apple’s iCloud, Dropbox, Microsoft, Twitter and Facebook — offer some form of login approval.

It might seem simple, but just a smidgen of time can almost double password security.

2. Update your browser and devices!

Browsers, operating systems and mobile devices often need updates. Sure, this can be a pain, but it’s important. Many times, updates are intended to patch just-now-discovered security problems.

Researchers are constantly finding new security holes that cyberattackers can exploit. So if an update notice comes through, never hesitate. It could be the difference between losing 15 minutes of your time and a hacker gaining control of your computer.

3. Use unique passwords and a password manager

People are really bad at making strong passwords. In 2014, the most common leaked passwords were “123456” and “password.” It’s also typical for people to include their birth year (especially those born between 1989 and 1992) in their passwords.

Hackers are up to your tricks. For each login, each website, each service, you should be using unique passwords that have nothing to do with a dead pet or your birthday. “But how do I remember all these passwords?” you might be asking. Well, you don’t have to.

There are a number of good password management services, such as LastPass or 1Password, that can generate and store login information in a virtual vault. Some even offer security-checking features that will let you know if you have duplicate or weak passwords.

4. Get a Google security checkup

Google is offering Drive users an extra 2GB of storage space if they take part in its Security Checkup program by Feb. 17. It takes a few minutes to run some quick tests on your Google accounts. To get started, click here.

The feature offers an overview of your recent sign-in activity (to see if any unusual devices are logging into your accounts). With the checkup, users can also grant and revoke account permissions on their devices, as well as add recovery information — such as a phone number — to help Google get in touch if something is up with your accounts.

5. Use HTTPS whenever you can

HTTPS is the secure version of hypertext transfer protocol — the letters that come before the “www.” in a web address. That last “S” can provide a big difference, however. HTTPS works to bidirectionally encrypt information sent between you and a website’s servers.

It isn’t perfect. HTTPS will not protect you from, say, government surveillance, but it can be surprisingly sophisticated in its protections. BMW, for example, failed to use HTTPS when transmitting data via its ConnectedDrive car system. That made the car vulnerable to remote hackers, who could have exploited that oversight to open car doors.

Most major websites are compatible with HTTPS, but it is best to be cognizant of the web addresses you’re using. There are tools, too, such as HTTPS Everywhere browser extension, that works to automatically switch any HTTP address over to HTTPS.


Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

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  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

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Reference: http://mashable.com/

Companies did not learn from LuxLeaks

Nearly three months after the first LuxLeaks report was published for Luxembourg, companies are still leaving themselves vulnerable to data breaches, suggest two Allen & Overy Senior Associates.

LuxLeaks

Senior Associate in Employment Law Gilles Dall’Agnol has keenly observed the reactions of companies to the two reports, which revealed tax agreements with international companies made by big four companies in Luxembourg.

“I think that LuxLeaks, for all its negative consequences, has had the effect of increasing awareness about the topic of data security,” he said.

As a result of the scandal, he says he expects to see the role of information security officers strengthened, along with the introduction of specific policies and mechanisms, such as whistleblowing structures. Meanwhile, he says companies will be more reluctant to outsource data security responsibilities.

However, Catherine Di Lorenzo, Allen & Overy Senior Associate in IP/IT and data protection law, said that many companies are failing to address a key question when securing tangible evidence of a data breach: are they authorised to monitor or screen employees’ emails?

“With respect to such screening, probably the most important part you have to know is that screening qualifies as employee monitoring which is only permissible if certain data protection rules have been complied with,” Ms Di Lorenzo explained, adding: “The data protection steps cannot be retroactively applied, which means if you’ve a suspicion to do with an email in which client data might have been sent, as you did not comply with data protection rules, the employer cannot simply go and screen the employee’s account.”

A company carrying out monitoring while having failed to comply with these rules exposes itself and its managers to criminal liability. In addition, evidence collected in this way is likely to be considered inadmissible in court.

This means, in other words, that a dismissal of an employee based solely on evidence collected in this way is likely to be ruled as abusive.

“If a company has not complied with the data protection rules, it should not even be carrying out a screening as this would itself qualify as a criminal offence. If the company does the screening anyway and finds something, it will most likely not be able to use it.

“It’s a disaster if you find yourself in such a situation,” Ms Di Lorenzo said, adding: “Compliance with data protection rules costs just one or two days’ work. But it is simply an element of corporate housekeeping everybody has neglected for a long time.”

Mr Dall’Agnol adds that in many such cases, companies do not have another choice but to make a criminal complaint without carrying out screening or employment law sanctions and leave it to the prosecutor to find the evidence.


Recommend

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computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.wort.lu/

Employee and customer privacy in an era of ‘Big Data’ monitoring

Exploring the challenges of real-time data monitoring and the role that legal plays in striking the right balance.

In the second article of this three-part series, we outlined how data analytics is an emerging tool that organizations are employing to detect hidden and emerging compliance and legal risks in their data. Now, we will explore the challenges of real-time data monitoring in an era of Big Data, and the role that legal plays in striking the right balance for the organization.

Prudent risk management or Big Brother?

It’s no surprise that the National Security Agency’s surveillance of social media sites and telecommunications, and several recent high-profile data breaches, are fueling an environment of mistrust regarding how companies collect and use the personal information of their customers and employees.

At the same time, organizations are looking to accelerate their monitoring, collection and analysis of data not only to gather business intelligence but also to improve risk management and data security practices. That means great scrutiny of both the organization’s networks and its employees. And as organizations move toward true real-time monitoring of their employees’ every electronic move, legal has a role to play in managing the risks associated with these monitoring activities.

The right to privacy

Does a right to privacy exist in the age of Big Data? Legally, the answer depends in large part on your geographic location. In many foreign jurisdictions, most notably the EU, privacy has been elevated to a human right. However, there are no comparable U.S. laws. And although the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the Constitution protects individuals against government intrusion, in the U.S. employees do not have a general right to privacy from employers’ monitoring of data on its own networks and devices.

The focus in the U.S. thus far has been on consumer privacy rights, not employee rights. On the federal level, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, Fair Credit Reporting Act, Gramm-Leach Bliley Act and Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act are just a few of the laws that regulate data collection and management practices; in some cases, those laws may impact employee’s data. Enforcement agencies like the Federal Trade Commission, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and state attorneys general have brought enforcement actions against companies that fail to protect consumers’ personal information. Organizations can expect increased regulation and enforcement to continue on both the federal and state fronts.

Privacy in the workplace

In contrast to the increased attention on consumer privacy, employees currently are entitled to little privacy when it comes to their activities at work. Employers already have a right to, and in fact do, monitor employee behavior on an organization’s network and devices. But much of this monitoring is theoretical — employers generally do so only when they are alerted to potential problematic conduct. That dynamic is rapidly fading into obscurity.

With the proliferation of mobile devices and social media, the line between business and personal is increasingly blurred. Employees use personal devices and social media accounts for work — and use those devices and accounts for personal activities. As organizations increase real-time monitoring of employee activity to manage risk and to meet the challenges of data security, they are on a potential collision course with as-yet unchartered territory of employee privacy. We have seen this increased risk of data monitoring already with National Labor Relations Board rulings restricting the monitoring of employee activity on social media sites not sponsored or controlled by the organization. We can expect additional potential restrictions where the line between personal and business information are blurred (such as BYOD).

Effective privacy and usage policies

At present, the best way to minimize the risks of real-time data monitoring is for legal to establish clear data-related policies and procedures that provide guidance to employees about the organization’s rights to collect, use, retain and monitor data on its networks, devices and websites. They should have senior-management buy-in and reflect the organization’s corporate values and principles. Policies should reflect the following:

  1. Ownership: Confirm to all employees that the organization owns any and all business data in any form — and has the right to access and protect that data — even if stored on personal devices.
  2. No expectation of privacy: Employees should be notified that they have no reasonable expectation of privacy with respect to any systems or devices used to store business data or to access the organization’s systems.
  3. Monitoring: Inform employees that they are being monitored, specify the type of monitoring that you are using and explain the business purpose for that monitoring.
  4. Acceptable use: Define the acceptable use of company networks, email and devices, including whether and when employees may use company systems for personal reasons and the consequences of such use.
  5. Personal devices: If employees are permitted to use personal devices for work, have clear polices on the applications authorized for business activity, and provide technologies that, to the extent possible, separate business from personal information. Also, require employees to turn over those mobile devices for examination when the employee leaves her employment or if the organization has reason to believe the employee is storing business data on that device outside of what is permitted by policy.
  6. Prohibited technologies: Instruct employees regarding the forms of communication, applications and websites that may not be used for business purposes.
  7. Enforce policies: Inform employees of the consequences of failing to abide by company policy and enforce those consequences for policy violations. Consider periodic attestations from employees that they understand and are abiding by these policies.

Know your organization and its data

As a result of changes in technology, communication channels, and the legal and regulatory environment, the landscape of data risk management is in a tremendous state of flux. It is incumbent upon legal to lead the development of data management practices, ensuring that it properly analyzes and weighs the legal and regulatory risks and that their policies are consistent with the corporate culture and business needs.


Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.insidecounsel.com/