Email Monitoring: Don’t Let Your Digital Archive Gather Digital Dust

Email MonitoringEmail monitoring can reveal a treasure-trove of information about how your email system is actually being used. Not how much RAM or storage space is being used, or how many spam messages are blocked each day, but how your employees are actually using email to perform their jobs. With email monitoring, the amount of intelligence that is available to you in aggregate is overwhelming, and can help you to learn more about your company, identify waste, improve efficiencies, and get a better handle on both compliance and customer service.

Email monitoring enables you to mine your email for patterns that will reveal very useful information about just how communications flow within your company and amongst partners, vendors, and customers. Seeing who is mailing who can show you who the strong communicators are, as well as who spends too much time emailing instead of “doing”. It can identify the needy folks who require a little more attention than others, and in the event of an unplanned turnover, can help to quickly identify who the key contacts were for a user who is no longer there.

Email is becoming the most important tool most users have for communications, and it’s very common to hear a voicemail greeting state that the fastest way to get a response is to hang up and email the person instead of leaving a voicemail. Email monitoring can let you see response times between receiving and responding to emails, and is a great way to determine whether or not SLAs are being met, and if customers are getting answers or being ignored.

And when it comes to customers, nothing is worse than an unanswered email. Remember that sales rep who worked for you six months ago, or the territory manager on vacation? What happens when a customer finally decides they are interested in making a purchase? Emails that go to inactive accounts lead to lost sales. Email monitoring can show you which old accounts are still getting email messages so you can set up forwarders and never lose another deal because no one responded to the customer’s email.

One thing most email systems will never have enough of is storage. Email monitoring helps you check for the hoarders, the ones who email non-business related files back and forth, and the people who use email like FTP. This will enable you to get a handle on your storage before you have to send out that urgent request asking everyone to purge their deleted items to free up space.

Compliance is another critical issue for many companies today, and email monitoring is a great tool to assist with this. Whether that is compliance with internal policies, proper business communications, or regulatory needs, being able to identify emails with inappropriate language, messages that are being forwarded or BCC-d to personal accounts, or communications with potential competitors is vital to protect the company’s interests and ensure that no customer is offended by unprofessional language, and no proprietary information is being emailed offsite.

Administrators spend significant time looking at their servers’ performance, their log files, and their resources, while ignoring the way users are actually using the systems. Email monitoring is a great way to get a handle on what is happening from a usage perspective which can help you identify trends, patterns, and problems, and get a better understanding of the whole system, from the server to the client. So dust off that horde of useful data and see what’s going on inside with email monitoring.


SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.gfi.com/blog/email-monitoring/

Can My Boss Do That? Computer Monitoring

Assume your boss can monitor any company-owned computer, PDA, or phone – and act on what they find. Deleted emails and computer files are not completely gone. If it was ever on your computer, it can still be found.

They may find out personal things that it’s just not good for a boss to know. Or, they may take advantage of being able to spy on workers.

employee monitoring

Your boss can monitor:

  • Internet use
  • Software downloads
  • Documents or files stored on your computer
  • What websites you visit and how long you stay
  • Anything that is displayed on your computer screen
  • How long you’re on your computer
  • How fast you type
  • If you type any key words from a list
  • E-mails (that you get or send). Emails can be read or automatically screened for certain words. Even if you are using a private email system on a work computer, those emails could be read.
  • Instant messaging and chatting

Bosses say they monitor their employees’ computer because they’re worried about:

  • workers wasting time
  • bandwidth use (when large files are downloaded)
  • exposing their computer systems to viruses
  • making sure that employees do not share secret company information
  • making sure employees don’t send emails that harass another worker, prove discrimination, or could be a problem in a lawsuit

Computer monitoring is not the best way to make sure your employees are doing good work — good managers look at the quality of work and how much workers are producing.

Protect Yourself

For most workers, you’re better of if you never have a problem because there’s nothing that would be a problem for your employer to find on your work computer.

It is better to use a personal email account (like Gmail or yahoo), instead of a work email, but that doesn’t give you total protection – there are ways to monitor your private emails sent from a work computer. Even with a separate account, there can also be problems if your boss monitors how much time employees spend on the internet and which sites.

Find out about any policies (in the handbook or elsewhere):

  • when they monitor workers
  • what kind of monitoring they do
  • how data from the monitoring is used
  • rules about personal use of company equipment

Don’t assume they’re following their own rules. Even without a policy, or no matter what the policy says, your boss may be monitoring your computer.

They can monitor your private computer use – even if they say that certain personal use is permitted.

Without union protection, they can change any rule at any time, and fire you even if you’re following their rules.

Even if your employer doesn’t monitor your email, don’t forget that emails can still be subpoenaed during a law suit.

What protections do workers have?

It’s hard say whether any particular worker has protection from monitoring in a specific situation because courts make different decisions in different areas. Some of the things that courts consider include:

  • if they had a good business reason for looking in workers’ computer files;
  • if there’s a policy or workers were told they were being monitored;
  • if workers can show they expected privacy on the computer (for example, you password protected your files).

Despite the name, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) usually does not stop bosses from reading your, um, electronic communications – email, instant messaging, etc. For most workers, it only covers listening to workers’ private conversations. It doesn’t cover situations when the company owns the computer, phone, GPS, or provides the internet access which it is monitoring.

Some union contracts or state laws may limit an employer’s ability to monitor your computer activity.

Workers that have additional protection

If you have a union, you have more protection. Unions can negotiate over monitoring, how the information from monitoring is used, and access to data (which can help make sure everyone is treated the same). Union workers always have the right to fight a discipline or firing, including the information it’s based on.

You may have some protection if you are communicating with your coworkers about work conditions, under laws that protect an employee’s ability to engage in concerted activity. If you have been fired or disciplined for complaining about your working conditions to other coworkers using e-mail, or for using your work computer for union organizing activities,

If you are fired for writing emails about something at work that’s illegal (discrimination, breaking wage laws, etc) that you’re trying to stop, you may have protection under anti-retaliation or whistleblower laws.


SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.staffmonitoring.com/

The Employee Computer Monitoring Law

As an employer, you should read the employee monitoring law below if you want to understand the legalities of employee monitoring. In short, it says that you, the employer, can monitor your employees’ actions on your computers. Employers should have an Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) in place that is made known to all their employees and they should be made aware that their computers and Internet activity are being monitored. Basically the law states that you can do whatever you want because the computers and the work done on them is your property.

The following article appeared in the journal “Computer Law & Security Report”, Vol 19 No 5

Employee Monitoring – Private Rights and Public Policy

The Information Commissioner published the final code of practice for the use of personal data obtained by employers as a result of monitoring at work (the “Code”) on 11 June 2003. This article reviews the Code and compares it to the earlier drafts published by the Data Protection Commissioner in October 2000 (the “DPC Draft Code”) and the Information Commissioner in July 2002 (the “IC Draft Code”). The comparison will examine how in the field of data protection public policy resolves the common tensions between upholding private rights and supporting commercial interests.

The Code

The Code recognizes that employers have a primary obligation to comply with the Data Protection Act 1998 (the “1998 Act”). It is implied in the opening remarks at Section 2 of the Code that the purpose of the 1998 Act is to protect the fundamental rights and freedoms of employees, notably their rights to privacy. Monitoring systems must, therefore, respect these fundamental rights and freedoms as well as contribute to economic and social progress, trade expansion and the well being of individuals.

The Code, given that it is part of a wider code of practice for employment practices, addresses head on the competing interests that lie behind data processing. The Code notes that balancing these interests is made more difficult by the fact that “it is not always easy to draw a distinction between work-place and private information”.

The Code distinguishes between two types of monitoring. “Systematic monitoring” is the routine monitoring of all or a particular group of employees and “occasional monitoring” is monitoring as a short-term measure to respond to a particular need. As systematic monitoring is likely to be the most problematic, this is the type of monitoring which the Code principally addresses. To emphasize the point that the Code is more relevant to larger employers, the new Information Commissioner, Richard Thomas, insisted that a short guidance note addressed to small businesses be published at the same time as the Code.

The key to compliant monitoring under the Code is the implementation of an impact assessments procedure. The procedure outlined in the Code should be familiar to any employer used to assessing risk, for instance to comply with its obligations under the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. Unlike health and safety law, there is no legal requirement for employers to document formally any assessments that are made. However, as these assessments would indicate that the employer was following the Code, they would be influential should the employer find itself on the receiving end of an Information

Commissioner’s investigation. It should be noted that the first step in the Information Commissioner’s audit procedure when investigating a data controller, after any preparatory meeting or visit, is to review relevant documentation. The Code sets out the requirements for impact assessments. They should identify the purpose of the proposed monitoring and its expected benefits as well as identify the adverse impact of the monitoring, the alternatives considered and other monitoring obligations to enable the employer to set out a conclusive justification for the monitoring.

The proportionality and lawfulness of any monitoring is therefore determined by the employer’s judgment of the benefits of any monitoring against the adverse impact of that monitoring. The Code sets out factors that should be considered when assessing adverse impacts, which include consideration of the level of intrusion into the private lives of the employees via interference with their private e-mails, telephone calls or other correspondence. In considering alternatives to monitoring, the Code recommends use of targeted or automated monitoring to reduce intrusion to employees in the workplace. The Code calls for employers to come to “a conscious decision as to whether the current or proposed method of monitoring is justified”. This can only be achieved after a proper examination of the adverse impact of any monitoring and consideration of all alternatives to it.

The Code includes a number of good practice recommendations, which are set out in section 3 of the Code and are explained in further detail in separate Supporting Guidance (the “Guidance”). These include the Information Commissioner’s “Core Principles” for monitoring, which are”

It will usually be intrusive to monitor your workers.

Workers have legitimate expectations that they can keep their personal lives private and that they are also entitled to a degree of privacy in the work environment.

If employers wish to monitor their workers, they should be clear about the purpose and satisfied that the particular monitoring arrangement is justified by real benefits that will be delivered.

Workers should be aware of the nature, extent and reasons for any monitoring, unless (exceptionally) covert monitoring is justified.

In any event, workers’ awareness will influence their expectations.

The area of most controversy has been the monitoring of electronic communications of employees. The Code recognizes this by setting out a number of data protection issues and points that should be incorporated into employers’ policies on the use of electronic communications. The Information Commissioner also includes under each guidance note in the Guidance a helpful list of key points and possible actions for employers to consider. The Guidance includes an explanation of the regulations made under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 that permit businesses in most cases to be able to intercept electronic communications (the “Lawful Business Practice Regulations”).

Disclaimer: This is the latest law to the best of my knowledge. As an employer, you should talk with your lawyer to get the most recent laws on the subject of employee computer monitoring.


SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.staffmonitoring.com/

Is It Time to Review Your Data Monitoring Policy?

computer data monitoringThe relationship between workers, their devices and company material can be hazardous if left unmonitored.

Did your employer review their BYOD or employee monitoring policies with you during your onboarding process? Or, has your company’s leadership team made any changes to their policy as cellphones and other mobile devices have been allowed access to company email and files?

As more mobile devices enter the workplace, employers have started extending their data monitoring policies to worker’s personal technology. Although employee monitoring is not a new concept and is often expected in the office, there is a strong aversion to cellphone monitoring, especially among millennials.

Need for Education

According to a nationwide study by TechnologyAdvice Research, more than a third of office workers don’t know their employers’ data monitoring policies.

“The responses suggest a need for greater transparency or education efforts among company management about monitoring policies in order to keep employees engaged and maintain trust in company policies and values,” said TechnologyAdvice Managing Editor Cameron Graham, the study’s author. About 20 percent of respondents were unaware of whether their activity was monitored, while 15.6 percent were aware that their computer use was monitored somehow, but were unsure of the specifics.

Employee Sentiment on Being Monitored

There is a major split in how employees feel about computer monitoring as opposed to mobile device monitoring in the workplace. “Employees seem fairly comfortable in general with employers tracking their computer use at work, considering only 19 percent of respondents said they often or sometimes worry about their employer viewing their Internet history,” said Graham.

But 64.3 percent of office employees stated they would be at least somewhat uncomfortable with their cellphone being monitored during work hours. This is especially true for millennial respondents, who reported being more uncomfortable with cellphone monitoring, but were also found to be less likely to know how they were being monitored.

“There is a clear concern when it comes to employers tracking cellphone use, which respondents viewed as a greater concern than keylogging software or video surveillance,” Graham said. “That fear of cellphone monitoring doesn’t seem to be based on negative experiences, though, with roughly just 1 in 20 employees saying they’ve been questioned about such use.”

BYOD Policy Concerns

Millennials are poised to make up 44 percent of the work population by 2025, yet are the least likely to know the details of employee monitoring policies, despite expressing more concern about mobile device privacy than other age group. As this younger demographic moves into the workforce, employers will likely face growing challenges over Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policies and mobile device monitoring.

“Involving all relevant parties in policy creation could help ease concerns over monitoring, and strike a balance in maintaining control over company information while discouraging insecure device use,” said Graham.


Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.datamation.com/

Computer Email Monitoring

  • Do you want to regulate the use of email to send commercial messages in your corporation?
  • Do you have a desire to restrict sender by only allowing employees to use specific mailbox to send emails and prohibiting using other mailbox?

As the importance of electronic mail has grown both for internal communications with co-workers and for external communications with customers, suppliers and business partners, so has the need to ensure that your email servers are working properly. Monitoring and maintaining the health of your email servers has become vital in your business’ communication and even in its very existence.

SurveilStar Email Monitoring is the all-in-one network monitoring solution, which covers the complete range of monitoring needs from availability monitoring to bandwidth and usage monitoring, as well as application, instant message and email monitoring.

  • Record incoming and outgoing SMTP/POP3 emails and Exchange emails
  • Record outgoing webmails and Lotus Notes emails
  • Record all contents of outgoing and incoming attachments
  • Record email subjects, senders, recipients, time, size, etc.

If you need to prevent one or multiple spammers, block some emails addresses, restrict the employees to send emails only to permitted email addresses, prohibit sending attachments or limit email size, you can set an Email policy to achieve the goals easily. Setting up a proper email policy for your business situation is just a breeze.

  • Block specified sender accounts
  • Block specified recipients
  • Block specified outgoing email domains
  • Block users from sending emails with any attachments
  • Block emails with specific subjects
  • Block users sending files with specific file names
  • Block users sending emails over limited size

How to Monitor Emails?

1. Download and install SurveilStar to your PC and PCs you would like to monitor. How to

2. Login SurveilStar Console, select the target computer (group) that you want to monitor email activity. Navigate to Monitoring >Email.

Monitor Emails

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

Wearable Workplace “Mood Monitors” Are About To Become A Thing

Wearable Workplace “Mood Monitors”

In a move sure to do wonders for the emotional well-being of office workers around the world, tech giant Hitachi has developed a line of wearable mood monitors designed to track and tabulate overall workplace happiness. Were I wearing one of their devices, I would grin from ear to ear and say that it’s a great idea to help improve office morale. But, since I’m not, I can say with a scowl that this feels like something right out of a creepy Office Space/”Brave New World” crossover fever-dream.

The monitors, which look something like a standard I.D. badge, reportedly contain a small accelerometer designed to tracks a wearer’s movement over the course of the workday, sending real-time data to its server up to fifty times per second. Movement, claims Hitachi, is a correlative indicator of a person’s mood, and by monitoring one, they believe they can calculate the other using a proprietary algorithm. The data collected from a single employee’s monitor is assessed alongside the data collected from their coworkers, and ultimately is used to rate an office’s overall happiness on a scale of 1-100.

Like many faddish corporate morale boosters, the path to these workplace mood monitors is paved with fairly good, if somewhat obvious intentions.Uproxx explains: “[Hitachi] Chief researcher Kazuo Yano says the concept for the device originated when they learned co-workers are more productive if they have better social relationships with one another.” How that becomes “electronically track everyone’s emotional state all the time,” though, is anyone’s guess.

As unsettling as the prospect of mood surveillance sounds, Hitachi’s technology already been tested in several workspaces, with early reports indicating it might actually make a difference in terms of productivity.Reports Rocket News 24: 

…in one call center where it was used, information from the employees’ happiness meters showed that those who had lively conversations during break time were happiest.

Because of this, the company restructured break time, letting people around the same age (who would be most likely to have “lively conversations”) take their breaks at the same time. The results were incredible, resulting in three times the productivity as before, and leading to more layout and infrastructure changes.

Rescheduled break time seems fairly benign as far as social engineering goes, but office mood monitoring raises a host of obvious privacy concerns. While Hitachiclaims their technology is designed to asses overall group mood, and not individual emotional states, it’s easy to imagine it being applied otherwise. Imagine, for example, mood based promotions, or being handed a pink slip based on number of unhappy work-days.

The devices reportedly cost one hundred thousand Yen (a little more than eight hundred dollars) per monitor, and will ship to buyers to this coming April. That means for some of you there’s still a little time left to enjoy being an anonymous workplace grouch. Enjoy it while it lasts.

Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:


computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://magazine.good.is/