Banking Sector Leads In Global Data Leakage – Infowatch Report

Data Leakage The banking and financial services industry is at high risk for data leakage with over 40 per cent of leaked personal data globally, according to the Infowatch Global Data Leakage Report 2014.

Infowatch Group is the global leader in data leakage protection solutions.

Its Chief Executive Officer, Natalya Kaspersky, said the industry was involved in the leakage of 313 million personal data attributed to 135 cases reported last year.

“Although healthcare segment recorded a higher number of cases, the personal data compromised were much lower in volume compared to the banking and finance sector at 58 million,” she said during her presentation via webinar today.

She said the type of data breached was led by information breach, followed by data fraud and exceeding access rights.

The way data was being leaked was also changing, she said, from the traditional paper or hard copy to a more sophisticated way through browsers and cloud.

Kaspersky said data leakage might soon overtake other threats when it comes to financial and reputation damage to an organisation.

“It is the consumers which are being put at risk when organisations did not put enough precautions to prevent leaks, as the report revealed that 92 per cent of information leaked are personal data,” she added.

Meanwhile, Infowatch Asia Pacific/Malaysia Regional Head, Renga Nathan, said the awareness on the importance of data leakage protection in Malaysia was still very low probably due to the lack of enforcement in terms of Personal Data Protection Act.

“In Malaysia, the penetration of such solutions is only about ten per cent, while in the banking sector only 30 per cent have that kind of protection,” he said.

However, there has been an increasing awareness whereby more organisations are now putting in more budget allocations to extend their data protection to leakage solutions.


SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.bernama.com.my/

Computer Email Monitoring

  • Do you want to regulate the use of email to send commercial messages in your corporation?
  • Do you have a desire to restrict sender by only allowing employees to use specific mailbox to send emails and prohibiting using other mailbox?

As the importance of electronic mail has grown both for internal communications with co-workers and for external communications with customers, suppliers and business partners, so has the need to ensure that your email servers are working properly. Monitoring and maintaining the health of your email servers has become vital in your business’ communication and even in its very existence.

SurveilStar Email Monitoring is the all-in-one network monitoring solution, which covers the complete range of monitoring needs from availability monitoring to bandwidth and usage monitoring, as well as application, instant message and email monitoring.

  • Record incoming and outgoing SMTP/POP3 emails and Exchange emails
  • Record outgoing webmails and Lotus Notes emails
  • Record all contents of outgoing and incoming attachments
  • Record email subjects, senders, recipients, time, size, etc.

If you need to prevent one or multiple spammers, block some emails addresses, restrict the employees to send emails only to permitted email addresses, prohibit sending attachments or limit email size, you can set an Email policy to achieve the goals easily. Setting up a proper email policy for your business situation is just a breeze.

  • Block specified sender accounts
  • Block specified recipients
  • Block specified outgoing email domains
  • Block users from sending emails with any attachments
  • Block emails with specific subjects
  • Block users sending files with specific file names
  • Block users sending emails over limited size

How to Monitor Emails?

1. Download and install SurveilStar to your PC and PCs you would like to monitor. How to

2. Login SurveilStar Console, select the target computer (group) that you want to monitor email activity. Navigate to Monitoring >Email.

Monitor Emails

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

Email Monitoring

WHO NEEDS EMAIL MONITORING SOFTWARE?

No matter who you are you can find a use for email monitoring software. It is great for parents because they can track with ease to whom their children are talking and what they are saying. This can help protect children from predators or cyber bullies.

Spouses who think their other half is cheating can be easily reassured of fidelity using email monitoring solutions. No need to hire expensive detectives! Email spy monitoring software will record in-going and outgoing emails, plus a wide range of other online activity. The spouse can read them without the significant other ever knowing about it.

Businesses can make sure that their employees are engaged in productive tasks using this type of software, as well. Many email monitoring systems allow you to also monitor program usage, website searches and more. One look at your reports can tell you if an employee is being productive or is wasting time on the company dime.

EMAIL MONITORING: WHAT TO LOOK FOR

This type of software has so many different email monitoring features it can be confusing picking the right one for your needs. That’s why we try out and compare each one.

Email Monitoring Features

This category is probably pretty obvious. Here we break down the best and worst email monitoring features of the software. This includes the ability to open email attachments, the ability to save and forward emails and if the software comes with alert features.

Computer Monitoring Features
These are the extra little tidbits that make the email monitoring system all that more useful. This category includes any feature that is used to monitor computer activity other than emails. This includes chat services, instant messages, web searches, webcam use, program use and more.

Help and Support
We know that you don’t have time to read long-winded instruction manuals for every little task. So, we highly rate software that is easy to use, even for new computer users. Unfortunately though, sometimes you really need help and you can’t find the answers in the instruction manual. That’s when you need fantastic customer service. We make sure that each of our top picks has top-notch customer service and we list their virtues in this category.

Compatibility
There’s no use having great features if they aren’t compatible with a wide range of email providers. We list all of the most popular email providers and their compatibility in this category.


Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download
Reference: http://email-monitoring-review.toptenreviews.com/

SHOULD YOU MONITOR YOUR EMPLOYEES’ E-MAIL?

There are all kinds of bona fide reasons why an employer might want to monitor employee e-mail. For example, many courts have found that an employer’s tolerance of off color jokes sent through the office e-mail system can be used as evidence of a “hostile environment” in a sexual harassment case. Similar cases abound in respect to employer tolerance of e-mail directed at particular races or nationalities, or office e-mails used as a means through which to spread defamatory accusations. An employer might be concerned about an employee’s misuse or disclosure of trade secrets or confidential information. An employer might want to look for evidence that key employees are being solicited by competitors or head hunters. And, of course, an employer might want to monitor employee productivity.

It is becoming much easier for employers to monitor employee e-mail (and for that matter, employee internet access). Employers have always had access to the company e-mail server, but many businesses are now installing surveillance software that permits employers to record each employee keystroke as it occurs – the data from the keystrokes are recorded even if an employee never saves the e-mail on a corporate computer. These programs will also monitor e-mail for key words, e-mail addresses, and so on, making it much easier for the employer to find out what it needs to know.
But is it legal?

On an increasing basis, employees are insisting that they have a reasonable expectation of privacy in the workplace. Virtually all employers tolerate at least some personal telephone calls, knowing that morale would suffer dramatically if they did not. Employees argue that e-mail has in many instances replaced the need for these kinds of calls, and they point out that almost everyone’s sensibilities would be offended if employers eavesdropped on a personal telephone call to a spouse, or child, or doctor. So why should e-mail be any different? Individual privacy, free from surveillance, is a hallmark of a civilized society, and the rights of the vast majority should not be infringed because a small minority abuses certain privileges.

It’s an attractive argument. But there are, of course, some fundamental, practical differences between personal telephone calls and e-mails. E-mails have the potential to be much more damaging to a company – unlike a telephone call, for instance, they can include hundreds of pages of attachments from company files, they can be directed to a great many recipients at the same time, and they exist in a concrete, reproducible form that can multiply geometrically through the forwarding process.

As so often happens with technology-related issues, it will take the law several years to analyze and react to the current realities. Here’s where we are right now.
The Current State of the Law

At present, the most important governing statute is the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), a federal law that generally prohibits the “interception” and disclosure of wire, oral and electronic communications. But the ECPA defines “interception” in a very narrow manner. Courts have generally interpreted the term to apply only to the review of an e-mail during its actual transmission from sender to recipient. Reviewing the e-mail after it is transmitted – for example, when it resides on the company’s e-mail server – is not an “interception” within the meaning of the statute.

In addition, the ECPA permits the interception of an electronic communication if: 1) one party consents in advance; 2) the employer furnishes the e-mail service; and 3) the employer intercepts the e-mail in the ordinary course of business. Requirements 2 and 3 generally take care of themselves. As for 2, so long as the e-mail was sent on a company system (as opposed to the employee’s personal AOL account), that is a non-issue. As for 3, the term “ordinary course of business” has been interpreted by the courts to mean anything to do with quality assurance, theft prevention, promoting employee productivity, avoiding liability, and so on.

But what about requirement 1, mandating consent? For years, we (as well as many other lawyers and consultants) have been preaching the message that every employer must promulgate and distribute to all employees an e-mail/internet policy which, in addition to specifying the dos and don’ts of e-mail and internet use, advises the employees that their e-mails and internet use are subject to employer monitoring. Consent can be established by proving that the employee received such a policy. (Word to the wise: if you do not have an appropriate e-mail policy that has been reviewed by competent counsel, you are running huge and avoidable liability risks for a great many other reasons as well.)

So, from the employer’s point of view, what’s the problem?
Why Compliance with the ECPA Is Not Enough

All of this is new and untested. We think that, with proper counsel, employers can easily satisfy the ECPA, but we do not think that compliance with the ECPA is an effective vaccination against all potential liabilities for e-mail surveillance. There are other statutes and legal proscriptions that may be implicated by an employer’s monitoring of employee e-mail, and those cases have yet to fully bubble to the surface.

For example, suppose you randomly select an employee and monitor his e-mail for a week in order to see if he is spending too much unproductive time engaged in personal e-mail activity. In the course of that monitoring, you read an e-mail in which the employee discloses to a friend that he is HIV positive. Or you read an e-mail that he sends to a union, disclosing his current efforts aimed toward organizing your office staff. You just got more information than you wanted to know. If, by chance, the employee is terminated three months later and believes that his termination was a result of your knowledge of his sickness or his union favoritism, the depositions could become very interesting. What happens when representatives of the employer are asked if, before the firing, they knew that the employee was HIV positive, or if they knew that he was engaged in a union organizing campaign? A routine termination has now become an ADA case, or an Unfair Labor Practice charge before the National Labor Relations Board. There is an unforeseeable variety of information that might be unintentionally gleaned from employee e-mails, such as the organizations they belong to, their sexual orientation, the medications they take, and so on. Sometimes, its better not to know.

Then picture this scenario. The employee’s most private and sensitive secrets, now known by the employer, are maintained in a file, stumbled upon by a clerical employee, and disclosed to other employees. Or a memo reflecting the information is accidently seen at the copy machine by another employee, and the word spreads. We believe that courts will be very sympathetic to employees who have their privacy breached, their careers ruined, or their personal lives shattered by these kinds of disclosures.

Up to this point, courts and legislatures have been very reluctant to chip away at an employer’s unfettered right to monitor employee e-mail, so long as the employer complies with the ECPA, but we caution against taking too much solace in these results. We believe that it is only a matter of time before the right fact pattern makes its way into a courtroom. Courts deal in precedent. Once a court establishes a precedent in this area, other courts will feel much more sanguine about following suit.

In addition, proposed federal legislation, which is expected to pass, evidences the beginnings of Congressional intent to address this issue. The pending Notice of Electronic Monitoring Act would require all employers to make employees aware of the type of computer use that the employer will monitor, how the monitoring will take place, and how often the monitoring will be conducted. Employees would receive notice of the monitoring activity upon hiring, annually thereafter, and whenever monitoring policies are altered. The law would not prohibit employers from monitoring e-mail, but it would make employees more conscious of the practice, and that will inevitably lead some employees to test the litigation waters. And, by the way, the proposed legislation would permit employees to sue their employers if the required notices were not provided.
The Action Plan

So what should your action plan be? Consider the following:

A global prohibition of all personal use of e-mail and internet use is not practical in most workplaces. Employers are usually better served by restricting the types of personal e-mail and internet use so that, for example, employees do not use the computers for unlawful purposes, or to violate their employer’s rights in trade secrets or intellectual property, or to conduct independent business activities, or in defined ways that could expose the employer to liability.
You must have an e-mail/internet policy. Counsel must be involved in the drafting and implementation of the policy so that it satisfies current law, so that it does not implicate violations of other laws (like the ADA and labor laws), and so that it stays up to date. It must also be distributed in such a way that you can prove it was received by all employees. And you must enforce it consistently.
If you choose to monitor employee e-mail, compliance with the ECPA mandates that you consult with counsel regarding who should conduct the monitoring, how and when it should be done, and what records should be kept respecting the efforts.
If you choose to use the sophisticated monitoring software now available, be mindful of the fact that “flagging” certain key words can become a litigation issue. It can become extremely relevant if, for instance, an employer chose to search for terms such as “union,” “organize,” “strike,” “HIV,” and the like.
Some states have enacted specific legislation that covers electronic and similar monitoring activities. You must get specific legal advice for all states in which you conduct business. Recently, for instance, a bill passed the California legislature making it a crime for an employer to monitor an employee’s e-mail without warning the employee in advance. The Governor vetoed the bill. But it will probably be back, and other states may jump on that and similar bandwagons.
Keep abreast of changes in the law, such as the expected enactment of the Notice of Electronic Monitoring Act. Of course, we will keep you apprised in Avoiding Lawsuits. Our law firm, and our affiliated training firm, are ready to provide you with assistance in these areas.

Powell, Trachtman, Logan, Carrle & Lombardo, P.C. is a full service law firm with offices in suburban Philadelphia, PA, Harrisburg, PA and Cherry Hill, NJ. Powell Trachtman represents a variety of commercial enterprises, entrepreneurs and business executives in respect to their litigation, litigation avoidance planning, business formation, business transactions, estate and tax planning, and other needs. We are also approved defense counsel for numerous insurance carriers in matters pertaining to professional malpractice, products liability, employment practices, directors and officers liability, and many other fields. For more information, contact us at info@powelltrachtman.com and visit our website at www.powelltrachtman.com.

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