Report: Netflix and YouTube Account for Half of Internet’s Traffic

Netflix and YouTube dominate over half of downstream Internet traffic in North America, according to a new report released by Canadian Internet monitoring firm Sandvine.

Traffic Source

Downstream traffic is data that goes from a source to a computer, and Netflix’s share of that is 31.6%. YouTube comes in second at about 18.7%, up 9% from the first half of this year.

The increased dominance of streaming services has also lessened the impact of peer-to-peer traffic and video piracy. BitTorrent accounts for around 4% of North American downstream Internet traffic, compared with 31% five years ago.

Statista‘s chart, which uses data from Sandvine’s Global Internet Phenomena Report, shows which shares of U.S. downstream web traffic can be attributed to different properties.

The mobile numbers from Sandvine’s report tell a bit of a different story. YouTube controls the largest portion of data, at nearly 17.7%. Facebook follows in a close second, about 2% behind.


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Reference: http://mashable.com/

5 super easy tips for better online security on Safer Internet Day

It’s Safer Internet Day! Every February 10, the occasion is meant to be a reminder — particularly to young people — of the perils of the Internet.

Internet Security

The hope is to encourage more responsibility when we use the Internet and mobile technology. That can mean a lot of things and can be as simple as being more respectful online.

But it’s also a reminder to better protect yourself and your personal information. Google, for example, is using the day to remind people about the importance of online security. Coincidentally, the U.S. government happened to announce a new government agency completely dedicated to combating cyberthreats on Tuesday.

Of course, it’s always a good time to remind people that it’s easier and perhaps more common than ever before to fall victim to online attackers and cybersecurity risks. Every person should be taking measures to stay safer online. Before your eyes glaze, we have some very easy things that anyone can do to protect themselves online.

1. Use two-factor authentication

With two-factor authentication, users have to provide, in addition to a typical password, a one-time code when using a log-in service. In most cases, the code is sent to your phone — in a text message, for example. So after entering your password, you then have to put in what’s basically a one-time second password.

Based on your preferences, two-factor authentication can occur every time you log in to something or only occasionally, like when logging into an account on a new device.

Many major websites offer two-factor confirmations. Google was among the first. But now a bevy of them — including Apple’s iCloud, Dropbox, Microsoft, Twitter and Facebook — offer some form of login approval.

It might seem simple, but just a smidgen of time can almost double password security.

2. Update your browser and devices!

Browsers, operating systems and mobile devices often need updates. Sure, this can be a pain, but it’s important. Many times, updates are intended to patch just-now-discovered security problems.

Researchers are constantly finding new security holes that cyberattackers can exploit. So if an update notice comes through, never hesitate. It could be the difference between losing 15 minutes of your time and a hacker gaining control of your computer.

3. Use unique passwords and a password manager

People are really bad at making strong passwords. In 2014, the most common leaked passwords were “123456” and “password.” It’s also typical for people to include their birth year (especially those born between 1989 and 1992) in their passwords.

Hackers are up to your tricks. For each login, each website, each service, you should be using unique passwords that have nothing to do with a dead pet or your birthday. “But how do I remember all these passwords?” you might be asking. Well, you don’t have to.

There are a number of good password management services, such as LastPass or 1Password, that can generate and store login information in a virtual vault. Some even offer security-checking features that will let you know if you have duplicate or weak passwords.

4. Get a Google security checkup

Google is offering Drive users an extra 2GB of storage space if they take part in its Security Checkup program by Feb. 17. It takes a few minutes to run some quick tests on your Google accounts. To get started, click here.

The feature offers an overview of your recent sign-in activity (to see if any unusual devices are logging into your accounts). With the checkup, users can also grant and revoke account permissions on their devices, as well as add recovery information — such as a phone number — to help Google get in touch if something is up with your accounts.

5. Use HTTPS whenever you can

HTTPS is the secure version of hypertext transfer protocol — the letters that come before the “www.” in a web address. That last “S” can provide a big difference, however. HTTPS works to bidirectionally encrypt information sent between you and a website’s servers.

It isn’t perfect. HTTPS will not protect you from, say, government surveillance, but it can be surprisingly sophisticated in its protections. BMW, for example, failed to use HTTPS when transmitting data via its ConnectedDrive car system. That made the car vulnerable to remote hackers, who could have exploited that oversight to open car doors.

Most major websites are compatible with HTTPS, but it is best to be cognizant of the web addresses you’re using. There are tools, too, such as HTTPS Everywhere browser extension, that works to automatically switch any HTTP address over to HTTPS.


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Reference: http://mashable.com/

Executive Viewpoint 2015 Prediction: APCON – Network Monitoring Will Become Easier

If the repeated and high profile security breaches of 2014 taught us anything, it’s that government agencies and companies — both big and small — need to be doing more to monitor their networks.

But, traditionally, network monitoring has been associated with those large enterprises, such as financial institutions, with growing and complex networks. These companies need full-traffic visibility to enable them to be proactive and reactive when it comes to data security and their reputation. To do it right requires experts, several of them. One to install and network the hardware. One to configure filters. Another to run the application, and then another to analyze the collected data. With cyber-attacks continuously in the news, midsize organizations are coming to the conclusion that they need the same levels of visibility.

Network Monitoring Will Become Easier

This move toward easier to deploy monitoring will be driven by midmarket companies and those companies with branch sites that are already starting to realize the need for centralized network monitoring. While many of the headlines from the past year focused on data breaches at large enterprises, smaller companies weren’t left untouched, and many executives have realized that there’s no such thing as “too small to hack.”

Then there are plenty of cyber criminals attempting to profit by accessing secure business data, intellectual property or consumer information. But it’s not just cybercriminals that these companies need to protect themselves from. Where they may have an even greater need for security is from either competitors or their own employees.

  • Frequently, companies have their servers hit by an overzealous employee at a competing company. Some companies are complaining that competitors are hiring hackers to access company information.
  • Or, possibly, a disgruntled former employee determined to strike what he or she thinks will be a crippling blow.

It is threats like these that midsize organizations need to protect themselves from. That’s why they need the visibility that monitoring can provide. That’s the only way to guarantee they can spot and address repeated attempts to breach the firewall by competitors, disgruntled former employees or cyber criminals.

They need to be able to see the traffic on their network, all of it. But, traditionally, to get that kind of visibility requires the type of monitoring infrastructure that is described above, one that is too costly for companies of this size and requires experts that they don’t have or can’t afford to hire. That’s why network monitoring is going to have to become easier to implement. The market is demanding it.

What is going to make network monitoring more accessible for these companies? Monitoring companies are going to have to bring all the different aspects of monitoring —the capturing, storage and analysis of the data — and put them all in one box that can be installed in a server room or closet. Now, it won’t have the complexity of an enterprise monitoring platform, as the kind that requires a stable of experts. What it will have, is all the functionality midsize organizations need to know when something is wrong so they can address the issue before it becomes a headline and a solution that is easily scalable for future growth.


Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download
Reference: http://www.virtual-strategy.com/2015/01/26/executive-viewpoint-2015-prediction-apcon-network-monitoring-will-become-easier#axzz3PzugigNW