Email Monitoring: Don’t Let Your Digital Archive Gather Digital Dust

Email MonitoringEmail monitoring can reveal a treasure-trove of information about how your email system is actually being used. Not how much RAM or storage space is being used, or how many spam messages are blocked each day, but how your employees are actually using email to perform their jobs. With email monitoring, the amount of intelligence that is available to you in aggregate is overwhelming, and can help you to learn more about your company, identify waste, improve efficiencies, and get a better handle on both compliance and customer service.

Email monitoring enables you to mine your email for patterns that will reveal very useful information about just how communications flow within your company and amongst partners, vendors, and customers. Seeing who is mailing who can show you who the strong communicators are, as well as who spends too much time emailing instead of “doing”. It can identify the needy folks who require a little more attention than others, and in the event of an unplanned turnover, can help to quickly identify who the key contacts were for a user who is no longer there.

Email is becoming the most important tool most users have for communications, and it’s very common to hear a voicemail greeting state that the fastest way to get a response is to hang up and email the person instead of leaving a voicemail. Email monitoring can let you see response times between receiving and responding to emails, and is a great way to determine whether or not SLAs are being met, and if customers are getting answers or being ignored.

And when it comes to customers, nothing is worse than an unanswered email. Remember that sales rep who worked for you six months ago, or the territory manager on vacation? What happens when a customer finally decides they are interested in making a purchase? Emails that go to inactive accounts lead to lost sales. Email monitoring can show you which old accounts are still getting email messages so you can set up forwarders and never lose another deal because no one responded to the customer’s email.

One thing most email systems will never have enough of is storage. Email monitoring helps you check for the hoarders, the ones who email non-business related files back and forth, and the people who use email like FTP. This will enable you to get a handle on your storage before you have to send out that urgent request asking everyone to purge their deleted items to free up space.

Compliance is another critical issue for many companies today, and email monitoring is a great tool to assist with this. Whether that is compliance with internal policies, proper business communications, or regulatory needs, being able to identify emails with inappropriate language, messages that are being forwarded or BCC-d to personal accounts, or communications with potential competitors is vital to protect the company’s interests and ensure that no customer is offended by unprofessional language, and no proprietary information is being emailed offsite.

Administrators spend significant time looking at their servers’ performance, their log files, and their resources, while ignoring the way users are actually using the systems. Email monitoring is a great way to get a handle on what is happening from a usage perspective which can help you identify trends, patterns, and problems, and get a better understanding of the whole system, from the server to the client. So dust off that horde of useful data and see what’s going on inside with email monitoring.


SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.gfi.com/blog/email-monitoring/

Computer Email Monitoring

  • Do you want to regulate the use of email to send commercial messages in your corporation?
  • Do you have a desire to restrict sender by only allowing employees to use specific mailbox to send emails and prohibiting using other mailbox?

As the importance of electronic mail has grown both for internal communications with co-workers and for external communications with customers, suppliers and business partners, so has the need to ensure that your email servers are working properly. Monitoring and maintaining the health of your email servers has become vital in your business’ communication and even in its very existence.

SurveilStar Email Monitoring is the all-in-one network monitoring solution, which covers the complete range of monitoring needs from availability monitoring to bandwidth and usage monitoring, as well as application, instant message and email monitoring.

  • Record incoming and outgoing SMTP/POP3 emails and Exchange emails
  • Record outgoing webmails and Lotus Notes emails
  • Record all contents of outgoing and incoming attachments
  • Record email subjects, senders, recipients, time, size, etc.

If you need to prevent one or multiple spammers, block some emails addresses, restrict the employees to send emails only to permitted email addresses, prohibit sending attachments or limit email size, you can set an Email policy to achieve the goals easily. Setting up a proper email policy for your business situation is just a breeze.

  • Block specified sender accounts
  • Block specified recipients
  • Block specified outgoing email domains
  • Block users from sending emails with any attachments
  • Block emails with specific subjects
  • Block users sending files with specific file names
  • Block users sending emails over limited size

How to Monitor Emails?

1. Download and install SurveilStar to your PC and PCs you would like to monitor. How to

2. Login SurveilStar Console, select the target computer (group) that you want to monitor email activity. Navigate to Monitoring >Email.

Monitor Emails

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

Danger of accidental data loss

A recent Kaspersky survey has revealed that accidental data sharing by staff now produces a greater amount of lost data than software vulnerabilities.

According to the 2014 Global Corporate IT Security Risks survey conducted by Kaspersky Lab and B2B International, 27% of all businesses have lost sensitive business data due to internal IT threats in the past 12 months. However, the global data shows that for the first time since Kaspersky Lab began tracking these incidents with this survey in 2011, accidental data sharing by staff now produces a greater amount of lost data than software vulnerabilities. Both sources of data loss are most commonly found in businesses within the Utilities & Energy and Telecom business sectors.

According to the report, the most common internal threat is still software vulnerabilities, which were reported by an average of 36% of all businesses. Accidental data leaks by staff (reported by 29% of all businesses), and loss/theft of mobile devices by staff (26% of respondents noted it) are the second and third most-commonly reported internal threats. As the biggest sources of data loss from internal incidents 20% of all survey participants named software vulnerability incident, while 22% said about losing data from an accidental leak by staff and 19% reported leakage due to loss of mobile devices by employees. These figures suggest that businesses are slowly winning their struggle with software vulnerabilities, but data loss is growing in other areas of businesses. Other examples of internal threats that lead to data loss incidents include intentional data leaks from employees and security failures by a third-party supplier.

One of the most alarming trends uncovered by Kaspersky Lab’s investigation of internal threats is how often they occurred in businesses within infrastructure sectors. For example the Telecom companies reported by far the highest rate of accidental leaks and data sharing by staff, at 42%. The Utilities and Energy sector reported the second-highest rate of this threat, at 33%, with Manufacturing also having a high figure – 31%.

Software vulnerabilities encountered by companies within the past year were also reported by a high number of organisations from these sectors: by 40% of business in the Utilities & Energy sector, 36% in Transportation/Logistics and 35% in Telecom and Manufacturing sector.

Kaspersky Lab today offers a number of security technologies to control applications, close software vulnerabilities and maintain control over mobile devices, and offers unmatched insight into cyber-threats targeting industrial control systems. To protect the specific needs of manufacturing, industrial and critical infrastructure environments, Kaspersky Lab offers a custom-designed version of the company’s endpoint security software, created for manufacturing and industrial settings. Kaspersky Lab also provides the Kaspersky Industrial Protection Simulation to help organisations train for cyber-attacks that could affect the infrastructure of their facility.

To cope with internal security threats along with an effective security solution, such as Kaspersky Endpoint Security for Business and special solutions for industrial systems, organisations should have comprehensive security policies and effective staff education: employees should understand and follow security rules of the company.


Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.gadget.co.za/

Email Monitoring

WHO NEEDS EMAIL MONITORING SOFTWARE?

No matter who you are you can find a use for email monitoring software. It is great for parents because they can track with ease to whom their children are talking and what they are saying. This can help protect children from predators or cyber bullies.

Spouses who think their other half is cheating can be easily reassured of fidelity using email monitoring solutions. No need to hire expensive detectives! Email spy monitoring software will record in-going and outgoing emails, plus a wide range of other online activity. The spouse can read them without the significant other ever knowing about it.

Businesses can make sure that their employees are engaged in productive tasks using this type of software, as well. Many email monitoring systems allow you to also monitor program usage, website searches and more. One look at your reports can tell you if an employee is being productive or is wasting time on the company dime.

EMAIL MONITORING: WHAT TO LOOK FOR

This type of software has so many different email monitoring features it can be confusing picking the right one for your needs. That’s why we try out and compare each one.

Email Monitoring Features

This category is probably pretty obvious. Here we break down the best and worst email monitoring features of the software. This includes the ability to open email attachments, the ability to save and forward emails and if the software comes with alert features.

Computer Monitoring Features
These are the extra little tidbits that make the email monitoring system all that more useful. This category includes any feature that is used to monitor computer activity other than emails. This includes chat services, instant messages, web searches, webcam use, program use and more.

Help and Support
We know that you don’t have time to read long-winded instruction manuals for every little task. So, we highly rate software that is easy to use, even for new computer users. Unfortunately though, sometimes you really need help and you can’t find the answers in the instruction manual. That’s when you need fantastic customer service. We make sure that each of our top picks has top-notch customer service and we list their virtues in this category.

Compatibility
There’s no use having great features if they aren’t compatible with a wide range of email providers. We list all of the most popular email providers and their compatibility in this category.


Recommend

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download
Reference: http://email-monitoring-review.toptenreviews.com/

E-Mail Privacy in the Workplace

Even with a well-heeled corporate privacy policy stating that all employee communications may be monitored in the workplace, the legality of e-mail monitoring is not as clear cut as one might think.

“ Thus, the principal legal loophole we rely on in allowing us to read e-mails with only one party consent is this legal fiction that the e-mail is already “received” and stored – whether or not the recipient has ever seen it. ”

Mark Rasch
Let’s suppose you are an employer. You have a well-written and well distributed policy on privacy in the workplace. You expressly state that employees have NO expectation of privacy in ANYTHING they do. You own the hardware, you own the software, you own the network. You reserve the right to monitor every keystroke, every website, every e-mail, every IM session, every chat discussion, and even monitor the lyrics to any song they happen to be listening to on their iPods (sounds like a fun place to work, doesn’t it?). You have your employees acknowledge that you have the right to do such monitoring, and they even swear that they consent to such monitoring.

Your lawyers examine the caselaw and find that, in every single case where an employer has attempted to monitor the electronic communications of employees (where there was a stated policy that this would occur) the courts have held that the employee has no reasonable expectation of privacy in the contents of their corporate e-mail. As former CIA Director George Tenet would say, that’s a “slam dunk.” Right? Well, my magic 8-ball tells me, “situation murky, try again later.”

Different states, different laws

The legal issues around e-mail monitoring all began with the telecommunications giant WorldCom – remember them? Kelly Kearney and Mark Levy lived in California and worked for a company that was acquired by WorldCom. Their valuable WorldCom stock options were handled by the Atlanta branch of Salomon Smith Barney (SSB). When their options went underwater, they sued SSB, and learned that their phone calls from California to Atlanta had been routinely tape recorded in Atlanta.

That’s where the trouble started. You see, Kearney and Levy didn’t know they were being recorded. Under California law, you can’t record someone’s conversation without telling them. Of course, no such law exists in Georgia where the recordings were actually made. You see, Georgia law only requires that one of the parties to the conversation consent to the recording to make it legal. Thus, you can record your own conversations, or, if your boss has obtained your consent (they say it’s “my way or the highway”), your boss may record your conversation with others. California, on the other hand, requires that everyone on the call consent to the monitoring. When Kearney and Levy learned they were recorded in Atlanta, they went to court in California and sued under California law. On July 17, the California court ruled that California’s interest in promoting privacy outweighed Georgia’s interest in not having its residents spend time in California jails. The case, Kearny v. Salomon Smith Barney, really focused on the concept of “conflict of laws” – or what to do when one state permits conduct that another state prohibits. Essentially, you balance the competing interests, and in this case, California’s court said California’s interests prevailed. Recognizing that it was a close case, the court did not apply its finding retroactively, and did not fine SSB for its actions.

Who can consent to monitoring?

A number of U.S. states require that, before you can record the contents of an “oral” or telephonic communication (or before you can “intercept” such a communication) you must have the consent of all parties to the conversation. Such is the law in Massachusetts (Mass. Ann. Laws ch. 272), Michigan (§99 Michigan, Mich. Comp. Laws §750.539c), Nevada (Nev. Rev. Stat. Ann. §200.620 – by court decision, and N. H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §570-A:2) South Carolina (S.C. Code Ann. §16-17-470), and Washington State (Wash. Rev. Code § 9.73.030).

Some states expressly extend this “all party consent” philosophy to “electronic” communications. This includes California (Conn. Gen. Stat. §52-570d:), Delaware (Del. Code Ann. tit. 11, §2402(c)(4)), Florida, (Fla. Stat. ch. 934.03), Hawaii, (Haw. Rev. Stat. §803-42), Illinois (720 ILCS 5/), Louisiana (La. Rev. Stat. §15:1303), Maryland (Md. Code Ann., Courts and Judicial Proceedings §10-402), Montana ( Mont. Code Ann. §45-8-213) and Pennsylvania (18 Pa. Cons. Stat. §5703).

It has frequently been in dispute, however, about whose law applies when the party doing the intercepting and the party being intercepted are in different states. As the Kearney court noted, in 1988 a Florida court found that the recording of a call between Georgia and Florida implicated the Florida all party consent law. In Massachusetts, courts found controlling where the recording took place – if in the Bay State, for example, Massachusetts law applied, if not, the other law controlled. In New York at least one court held that a person who lived in New York (which is a one party consent state) who was recorded in another state that required all parties to consent could not sue for a violation of the other state’s law. In another New York case, a California resident surreptitiously recorded conversations with a New York plastic surgeon with whom she was collaborating on a book. Even though this clearly violated California law, the New York court provided no remedy in April of 2006, because the plastic surgeon had no expectation of privacy in the call – as a New York resident. In 1982, when a Texas resident recorded telephone conversations with other company employees in California, Texas’ one party consent controlled over California’s all party consent.

It was into this fray that the California Supreme Court jumped, and essentially said that privacy interests trump other interests. What does this mean for the employer in single party consent states?

E-mail monitoring

In many states, the same law that prohibits the interception or recording of telephone calls also prohibits the interception or recording of electronic communications without the consent of all parties. So if I send an e-mail from California to you in Georgia, and your boss reads it in accordance with your company’s policy (but without my consent) is it legal? It must be legal because we all do it, right? How could it be illegal? How could you expect any privacy in an e-mail to a Georgia company?

Article Source: http://www.securityfocus.com/columnists/412

Wanna secure your company? Try Surveilstar Now!

SHOULD YOU MONITOR YOUR EMPLOYEES’ E-MAIL?

There are all kinds of bona fide reasons why an employer might want to monitor employee e-mail. For example, many courts have found that an employer’s tolerance of off color jokes sent through the office e-mail system can be used as evidence of a “hostile environment” in a sexual harassment case. Similar cases abound in respect to employer tolerance of e-mail directed at particular races or nationalities, or office e-mails used as a means through which to spread defamatory accusations. An employer might be concerned about an employee’s misuse or disclosure of trade secrets or confidential information. An employer might want to look for evidence that key employees are being solicited by competitors or head hunters. And, of course, an employer might want to monitor employee productivity.

It is becoming much easier for employers to monitor employee e-mail (and for that matter, employee internet access). Employers have always had access to the company e-mail server, but many businesses are now installing surveillance software that permits employers to record each employee keystroke as it occurs – the data from the keystrokes are recorded even if an employee never saves the e-mail on a corporate computer. These programs will also monitor e-mail for key words, e-mail addresses, and so on, making it much easier for the employer to find out what it needs to know.
But is it legal?

On an increasing basis, employees are insisting that they have a reasonable expectation of privacy in the workplace. Virtually all employers tolerate at least some personal telephone calls, knowing that morale would suffer dramatically if they did not. Employees argue that e-mail has in many instances replaced the need for these kinds of calls, and they point out that almost everyone’s sensibilities would be offended if employers eavesdropped on a personal telephone call to a spouse, or child, or doctor. So why should e-mail be any different? Individual privacy, free from surveillance, is a hallmark of a civilized society, and the rights of the vast majority should not be infringed because a small minority abuses certain privileges.

It’s an attractive argument. But there are, of course, some fundamental, practical differences between personal telephone calls and e-mails. E-mails have the potential to be much more damaging to a company – unlike a telephone call, for instance, they can include hundreds of pages of attachments from company files, they can be directed to a great many recipients at the same time, and they exist in a concrete, reproducible form that can multiply geometrically through the forwarding process.

As so often happens with technology-related issues, it will take the law several years to analyze and react to the current realities. Here’s where we are right now.
The Current State of the Law

At present, the most important governing statute is the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), a federal law that generally prohibits the “interception” and disclosure of wire, oral and electronic communications. But the ECPA defines “interception” in a very narrow manner. Courts have generally interpreted the term to apply only to the review of an e-mail during its actual transmission from sender to recipient. Reviewing the e-mail after it is transmitted – for example, when it resides on the company’s e-mail server – is not an “interception” within the meaning of the statute.

In addition, the ECPA permits the interception of an electronic communication if: 1) one party consents in advance; 2) the employer furnishes the e-mail service; and 3) the employer intercepts the e-mail in the ordinary course of business. Requirements 2 and 3 generally take care of themselves. As for 2, so long as the e-mail was sent on a company system (as opposed to the employee’s personal AOL account), that is a non-issue. As for 3, the term “ordinary course of business” has been interpreted by the courts to mean anything to do with quality assurance, theft prevention, promoting employee productivity, avoiding liability, and so on.

But what about requirement 1, mandating consent? For years, we (as well as many other lawyers and consultants) have been preaching the message that every employer must promulgate and distribute to all employees an e-mail/internet policy which, in addition to specifying the dos and don’ts of e-mail and internet use, advises the employees that their e-mails and internet use are subject to employer monitoring. Consent can be established by proving that the employee received such a policy. (Word to the wise: if you do not have an appropriate e-mail policy that has been reviewed by competent counsel, you are running huge and avoidable liability risks for a great many other reasons as well.)

So, from the employer’s point of view, what’s the problem?
Why Compliance with the ECPA Is Not Enough

All of this is new and untested. We think that, with proper counsel, employers can easily satisfy the ECPA, but we do not think that compliance with the ECPA is an effective vaccination against all potential liabilities for e-mail surveillance. There are other statutes and legal proscriptions that may be implicated by an employer’s monitoring of employee e-mail, and those cases have yet to fully bubble to the surface.

For example, suppose you randomly select an employee and monitor his e-mail for a week in order to see if he is spending too much unproductive time engaged in personal e-mail activity. In the course of that monitoring, you read an e-mail in which the employee discloses to a friend that he is HIV positive. Or you read an e-mail that he sends to a union, disclosing his current efforts aimed toward organizing your office staff. You just got more information than you wanted to know. If, by chance, the employee is terminated three months later and believes that his termination was a result of your knowledge of his sickness or his union favoritism, the depositions could become very interesting. What happens when representatives of the employer are asked if, before the firing, they knew that the employee was HIV positive, or if they knew that he was engaged in a union organizing campaign? A routine termination has now become an ADA case, or an Unfair Labor Practice charge before the National Labor Relations Board. There is an unforeseeable variety of information that might be unintentionally gleaned from employee e-mails, such as the organizations they belong to, their sexual orientation, the medications they take, and so on. Sometimes, its better not to know.

Then picture this scenario. The employee’s most private and sensitive secrets, now known by the employer, are maintained in a file, stumbled upon by a clerical employee, and disclosed to other employees. Or a memo reflecting the information is accidently seen at the copy machine by another employee, and the word spreads. We believe that courts will be very sympathetic to employees who have their privacy breached, their careers ruined, or their personal lives shattered by these kinds of disclosures.

Up to this point, courts and legislatures have been very reluctant to chip away at an employer’s unfettered right to monitor employee e-mail, so long as the employer complies with the ECPA, but we caution against taking too much solace in these results. We believe that it is only a matter of time before the right fact pattern makes its way into a courtroom. Courts deal in precedent. Once a court establishes a precedent in this area, other courts will feel much more sanguine about following suit.

In addition, proposed federal legislation, which is expected to pass, evidences the beginnings of Congressional intent to address this issue. The pending Notice of Electronic Monitoring Act would require all employers to make employees aware of the type of computer use that the employer will monitor, how the monitoring will take place, and how often the monitoring will be conducted. Employees would receive notice of the monitoring activity upon hiring, annually thereafter, and whenever monitoring policies are altered. The law would not prohibit employers from monitoring e-mail, but it would make employees more conscious of the practice, and that will inevitably lead some employees to test the litigation waters. And, by the way, the proposed legislation would permit employees to sue their employers if the required notices were not provided.
The Action Plan

So what should your action plan be? Consider the following:

A global prohibition of all personal use of e-mail and internet use is not practical in most workplaces. Employers are usually better served by restricting the types of personal e-mail and internet use so that, for example, employees do not use the computers for unlawful purposes, or to violate their employer’s rights in trade secrets or intellectual property, or to conduct independent business activities, or in defined ways that could expose the employer to liability.
You must have an e-mail/internet policy. Counsel must be involved in the drafting and implementation of the policy so that it satisfies current law, so that it does not implicate violations of other laws (like the ADA and labor laws), and so that it stays up to date. It must also be distributed in such a way that you can prove it was received by all employees. And you must enforce it consistently.
If you choose to monitor employee e-mail, compliance with the ECPA mandates that you consult with counsel regarding who should conduct the monitoring, how and when it should be done, and what records should be kept respecting the efforts.
If you choose to use the sophisticated monitoring software now available, be mindful of the fact that “flagging” certain key words can become a litigation issue. It can become extremely relevant if, for instance, an employer chose to search for terms such as “union,” “organize,” “strike,” “HIV,” and the like.
Some states have enacted specific legislation that covers electronic and similar monitoring activities. You must get specific legal advice for all states in which you conduct business. Recently, for instance, a bill passed the California legislature making it a crime for an employer to monitor an employee’s e-mail without warning the employee in advance. The Governor vetoed the bill. But it will probably be back, and other states may jump on that and similar bandwagons.
Keep abreast of changes in the law, such as the expected enactment of the Notice of Electronic Monitoring Act. Of course, we will keep you apprised in Avoiding Lawsuits. Our law firm, and our affiliated training firm, are ready to provide you with assistance in these areas.

Powell, Trachtman, Logan, Carrle & Lombardo, P.C. is a full service law firm with offices in suburban Philadelphia, PA, Harrisburg, PA and Cherry Hill, NJ. Powell Trachtman represents a variety of commercial enterprises, entrepreneurs and business executives in respect to their litigation, litigation avoidance planning, business formation, business transactions, estate and tax planning, and other needs. We are also approved defense counsel for numerous insurance carriers in matters pertaining to professional malpractice, products liability, employment practices, directors and officers liability, and many other fields. For more information, contact us at info@powelltrachtman.com and visit our website at www.powelltrachtman.com.

©Copyright 2003 Powell, Trachtman, Logan, Carrle & Lombardo P.C. All rights reserved, except that recipients hereof are permitted, for noncommercial purposes, to provide copies or excerpts, with full attribution to us, to other interested persons for their personal use. Avoiding Lawsuits is distributed for general informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for personalized legal advice from a competent attorney.

Article Source: http://www.powelltrachtman.com/CM/Publications/Should-You-Monitor.asp