Email Monitoring: Don’t Let Your Digital Archive Gather Digital Dust

Email MonitoringEmail monitoring can reveal a treasure-trove of information about how your email system is actually being used. Not how much RAM or storage space is being used, or how many spam messages are blocked each day, but how your employees are actually using email to perform their jobs. With email monitoring, the amount of intelligence that is available to you in aggregate is overwhelming, and can help you to learn more about your company, identify waste, improve efficiencies, and get a better handle on both compliance and customer service.

Email monitoring enables you to mine your email for patterns that will reveal very useful information about just how communications flow within your company and amongst partners, vendors, and customers. Seeing who is mailing who can show you who the strong communicators are, as well as who spends too much time emailing instead of “doing”. It can identify the needy folks who require a little more attention than others, and in the event of an unplanned turnover, can help to quickly identify who the key contacts were for a user who is no longer there.

Email is becoming the most important tool most users have for communications, and it’s very common to hear a voicemail greeting state that the fastest way to get a response is to hang up and email the person instead of leaving a voicemail. Email monitoring can let you see response times between receiving and responding to emails, and is a great way to determine whether or not SLAs are being met, and if customers are getting answers or being ignored.

And when it comes to customers, nothing is worse than an unanswered email. Remember that sales rep who worked for you six months ago, or the territory manager on vacation? What happens when a customer finally decides they are interested in making a purchase? Emails that go to inactive accounts lead to lost sales. Email monitoring can show you which old accounts are still getting email messages so you can set up forwarders and never lose another deal because no one responded to the customer’s email.

One thing most email systems will never have enough of is storage. Email monitoring helps you check for the hoarders, the ones who email non-business related files back and forth, and the people who use email like FTP. This will enable you to get a handle on your storage before you have to send out that urgent request asking everyone to purge their deleted items to free up space.

Compliance is another critical issue for many companies today, and email monitoring is a great tool to assist with this. Whether that is compliance with internal policies, proper business communications, or regulatory needs, being able to identify emails with inappropriate language, messages that are being forwarded or BCC-d to personal accounts, or communications with potential competitors is vital to protect the company’s interests and ensure that no customer is offended by unprofessional language, and no proprietary information is being emailed offsite.

Administrators spend significant time looking at their servers’ performance, their log files, and their resources, while ignoring the way users are actually using the systems. Email monitoring is a great way to get a handle on what is happening from a usage perspective which can help you identify trends, patterns, and problems, and get a better understanding of the whole system, from the server to the client. So dust off that horde of useful data and see what’s going on inside with email monitoring.


SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.gfi.com/blog/email-monitoring/

Can My Boss Do That? Computer Monitoring

Assume your boss can monitor any company-owned computer, PDA, or phone – and act on what they find. Deleted emails and computer files are not completely gone. If it was ever on your computer, it can still be found.

They may find out personal things that it’s just not good for a boss to know. Or, they may take advantage of being able to spy on workers.

employee monitoring

Your boss can monitor:

  • Internet use
  • Software downloads
  • Documents or files stored on your computer
  • What websites you visit and how long you stay
  • Anything that is displayed on your computer screen
  • How long you’re on your computer
  • How fast you type
  • If you type any key words from a list
  • E-mails (that you get or send). Emails can be read or automatically screened for certain words. Even if you are using a private email system on a work computer, those emails could be read.
  • Instant messaging and chatting

Bosses say they monitor their employees’ computer because they’re worried about:

  • workers wasting time
  • bandwidth use (when large files are downloaded)
  • exposing their computer systems to viruses
  • making sure that employees do not share secret company information
  • making sure employees don’t send emails that harass another worker, prove discrimination, or could be a problem in a lawsuit

Computer monitoring is not the best way to make sure your employees are doing good work — good managers look at the quality of work and how much workers are producing.

Protect Yourself

For most workers, you’re better of if you never have a problem because there’s nothing that would be a problem for your employer to find on your work computer.

It is better to use a personal email account (like Gmail or yahoo), instead of a work email, but that doesn’t give you total protection – there are ways to monitor your private emails sent from a work computer. Even with a separate account, there can also be problems if your boss monitors how much time employees spend on the internet and which sites.

Find out about any policies (in the handbook or elsewhere):

  • when they monitor workers
  • what kind of monitoring they do
  • how data from the monitoring is used
  • rules about personal use of company equipment

Don’t assume they’re following their own rules. Even without a policy, or no matter what the policy says, your boss may be monitoring your computer.

They can monitor your private computer use – even if they say that certain personal use is permitted.

Without union protection, they can change any rule at any time, and fire you even if you’re following their rules.

Even if your employer doesn’t monitor your email, don’t forget that emails can still be subpoenaed during a law suit.

What protections do workers have?

It’s hard say whether any particular worker has protection from monitoring in a specific situation because courts make different decisions in different areas. Some of the things that courts consider include:

  • if they had a good business reason for looking in workers’ computer files;
  • if there’s a policy or workers were told they were being monitored;
  • if workers can show they expected privacy on the computer (for example, you password protected your files).

Despite the name, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) usually does not stop bosses from reading your, um, electronic communications – email, instant messaging, etc. For most workers, it only covers listening to workers’ private conversations. It doesn’t cover situations when the company owns the computer, phone, GPS, or provides the internet access which it is monitoring.

Some union contracts or state laws may limit an employer’s ability to monitor your computer activity.

Workers that have additional protection

If you have a union, you have more protection. Unions can negotiate over monitoring, how the information from monitoring is used, and access to data (which can help make sure everyone is treated the same). Union workers always have the right to fight a discipline or firing, including the information it’s based on.

You may have some protection if you are communicating with your coworkers about work conditions, under laws that protect an employee’s ability to engage in concerted activity. If you have been fired or disciplined for complaining about your working conditions to other coworkers using e-mail, or for using your work computer for union organizing activities,

If you are fired for writing emails about something at work that’s illegal (discrimination, breaking wage laws, etc) that you’re trying to stop, you may have protection under anti-retaliation or whistleblower laws.


SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.staffmonitoring.com/

The Employee Computer Monitoring Law

As an employer, you should read the employee monitoring law below if you want to understand the legalities of employee monitoring. In short, it says that you, the employer, can monitor your employees’ actions on your computers. Employers should have an Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) in place that is made known to all their employees and they should be made aware that their computers and Internet activity are being monitored. Basically the law states that you can do whatever you want because the computers and the work done on them is your property.

The following article appeared in the journal “Computer Law & Security Report”, Vol 19 No 5

Employee Monitoring – Private Rights and Public Policy

The Information Commissioner published the final code of practice for the use of personal data obtained by employers as a result of monitoring at work (the “Code”) on 11 June 2003. This article reviews the Code and compares it to the earlier drafts published by the Data Protection Commissioner in October 2000 (the “DPC Draft Code”) and the Information Commissioner in July 2002 (the “IC Draft Code”). The comparison will examine how in the field of data protection public policy resolves the common tensions between upholding private rights and supporting commercial interests.

The Code

The Code recognizes that employers have a primary obligation to comply with the Data Protection Act 1998 (the “1998 Act”). It is implied in the opening remarks at Section 2 of the Code that the purpose of the 1998 Act is to protect the fundamental rights and freedoms of employees, notably their rights to privacy. Monitoring systems must, therefore, respect these fundamental rights and freedoms as well as contribute to economic and social progress, trade expansion and the well being of individuals.

The Code, given that it is part of a wider code of practice for employment practices, addresses head on the competing interests that lie behind data processing. The Code notes that balancing these interests is made more difficult by the fact that “it is not always easy to draw a distinction between work-place and private information”.

The Code distinguishes between two types of monitoring. “Systematic monitoring” is the routine monitoring of all or a particular group of employees and “occasional monitoring” is monitoring as a short-term measure to respond to a particular need. As systematic monitoring is likely to be the most problematic, this is the type of monitoring which the Code principally addresses. To emphasize the point that the Code is more relevant to larger employers, the new Information Commissioner, Richard Thomas, insisted that a short guidance note addressed to small businesses be published at the same time as the Code.

The key to compliant monitoring under the Code is the implementation of an impact assessments procedure. The procedure outlined in the Code should be familiar to any employer used to assessing risk, for instance to comply with its obligations under the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. Unlike health and safety law, there is no legal requirement for employers to document formally any assessments that are made. However, as these assessments would indicate that the employer was following the Code, they would be influential should the employer find itself on the receiving end of an Information

Commissioner’s investigation. It should be noted that the first step in the Information Commissioner’s audit procedure when investigating a data controller, after any preparatory meeting or visit, is to review relevant documentation. The Code sets out the requirements for impact assessments. They should identify the purpose of the proposed monitoring and its expected benefits as well as identify the adverse impact of the monitoring, the alternatives considered and other monitoring obligations to enable the employer to set out a conclusive justification for the monitoring.

The proportionality and lawfulness of any monitoring is therefore determined by the employer’s judgment of the benefits of any monitoring against the adverse impact of that monitoring. The Code sets out factors that should be considered when assessing adverse impacts, which include consideration of the level of intrusion into the private lives of the employees via interference with their private e-mails, telephone calls or other correspondence. In considering alternatives to monitoring, the Code recommends use of targeted or automated monitoring to reduce intrusion to employees in the workplace. The Code calls for employers to come to “a conscious decision as to whether the current or proposed method of monitoring is justified”. This can only be achieved after a proper examination of the adverse impact of any monitoring and consideration of all alternatives to it.

The Code includes a number of good practice recommendations, which are set out in section 3 of the Code and are explained in further detail in separate Supporting Guidance (the “Guidance”). These include the Information Commissioner’s “Core Principles” for monitoring, which are”

It will usually be intrusive to monitor your workers.

Workers have legitimate expectations that they can keep their personal lives private and that they are also entitled to a degree of privacy in the work environment.

If employers wish to monitor their workers, they should be clear about the purpose and satisfied that the particular monitoring arrangement is justified by real benefits that will be delivered.

Workers should be aware of the nature, extent and reasons for any monitoring, unless (exceptionally) covert monitoring is justified.

In any event, workers’ awareness will influence their expectations.

The area of most controversy has been the monitoring of electronic communications of employees. The Code recognizes this by setting out a number of data protection issues and points that should be incorporated into employers’ policies on the use of electronic communications. The Information Commissioner also includes under each guidance note in the Guidance a helpful list of key points and possible actions for employers to consider. The Guidance includes an explanation of the regulations made under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 that permit businesses in most cases to be able to intercept electronic communications (the “Lawful Business Practice Regulations”).

Disclaimer: This is the latest law to the best of my knowledge. As an employer, you should talk with your lawyer to get the most recent laws on the subject of employee computer monitoring.


SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.staffmonitoring.com/

Spy Tools Reviews | SurveilStar Employee Monitoring Software

spy software

The need for computer monitoring tool or spy is very common now. Many parents wish to have something which can keep an eye on their child’s activity while sitting on computer. Many companies CEO’s are worried about their non-committed employees and wish to find out what they do in office time. Well, there indeed are such tools which can spy and record all the activities of your child, employee or student on computer. SurveilStar is a computer monitoring tool which records all the activities of user. It will record everything including chats, emails, applications, files etc. you can see their online activities and much more with the help of SurveilStar. All you have to do is to download it and install it into your computer. It will automatically start working and spying. You don’t have to start or stop it. Not only that you can also restrict many of their activities.

=> Visit the Official Website of SurveilStar

Who uses SurveilStar?

SurveilStar software is for anyone who wishes to know all the activities of people using their PC. It is the best parental control. Parents can see what their children do on internet. They can see the record of websites they visit, read their chats of both sides, read their emails and see the pictures and videos they download. Parents can protect their child from Internet abuse. Also, those who wish to record their employee’s activity can use SurveilStar. See how much time they are giving to your work and how much time are they wasting. Also, you can block some activities for both employees and children. Not only that many internet cafes and school labs can use SurveilStar to protect their computer from misuse.

employee monitoring software

Features

  • Logs everything- all the keystrokes typed are recorded
  • Screen shots- it takes screen snap shots. You can view the whole picture of activities in real time
  • Email- see the emails they send and receive. With every new email receive and send you are notified. Also, you can see the files they attach.
  • Chats/conversation- you can read their chats. All the conversation is recorded. SurveilStar many programs and social networks
  • Website visit- you can see the websites they visit and the keywords they use. Also, you can block the sites you don’t want your child to see
  • Applications- see the applications they open along with the time and user name
  • Network- it records the IP address, network traffic etc. you can limit the speed of internet bandwidth and port.
  • Management- it divides all the users into groups. All the activities are managed in an organized way
  • Password-all the logs are saved in an encrypted file. You can see them via email id and you have password protection.
  • And much more…

Conclusion

SurveilStar is an excellent software and unlike many other software it is more efficient with more great features. SurveilStar can work best for any office, home, school and café. You can easily monitor all the activities through this great monitoring tool.

=> Visit the Official Website of SurveilStar

Leaked employee passwords open up Fortune 500 companies to hackers

Leaked employee passwords

 

It’s one thing when your iCloud account with personal photos gets hacked. It’s another when your Fortune 500 company has a data breach because your office credentials were leaked online.

At 221 of the Fortune 500 companies, Fortune magazine’s list of the the top 500 U.S. public corporations ranked by gross revenue, employees’ credentials are posted publicly online for hackers to steal and reuse in cyberattacks, according to new research from the web intelligence firm Recorded Future.

Corporations, especially highly sensitive targets like Fortune 500 companies, spend a great deal on securing their networks against hackers, but that could be for naught if an employee carelessly uses his office credentials to sign up for, say, a gaming forum.

The sensitive information can be found on forums and text repositories like Pastebin, which are fertile ground for username and password dumps. Researchers at Recorded Future scoured approximately 600,000 websites for credentials posted between Jan. 1 and Oct. 8, 2014. During their analysis, they found at least one username/password combination at 44% of the Fortune 500 companies, leaving those companies vulnerable to hackers who could use the data to break into networks or mount phishing and social engineering attacks, Recorded Future CEO and cofounder Christopher Ahlberg told Mashable.

These credential dumps are outside the companies’ control, Ahlberg said. The data likely come from third party sites — not from breaches of companies’ servers — where an employee used a corporate email to sign up for something. In the past few years, for example, hackers have breached websites and services like Adobe and Forbes.

One caveat is that there is no way to know whether the password used on a third-party site matches the employee’s password used on his corporate account. In other words, Fortune 500 employees’ information may be posted online — but it doesn’t necessarily that information will lead to a successful compromise.

“It’s a coin flip whether or not these credentials taken from third party sites are valid,” Scott Donnelly, the lead researcher on the report, told Mashable. “But when there’s 10 or 20 from a particular company, then odds are you’ve got one that’s valid.”

Below, the breakdown of the 221 companies listed in the report:

Leaked employee passwords open up Fortune 500 companies to hackers

companies

But having an employee’s username and password isn’t necessarily enough — hackers need to know where to use them. In some cases, Recorded Future also found that the webmail login pages of some utility companies are easily searchable on Google, which makes those companies even more vulnerable if an employee’s credentials are compromised.

The report doesn’t name names — either of companies or individuals — and Recorded Future has not notified any of the companies yet, according to Ahlberg and Donnelly. The goal of their research, they said, is to show that big companies are not immune to huge password leaks.

We’ve seen evidence of that lately.

Two weeks ago, a hacker claimed to have dumped 7 million Dropbox usernames and credentials. In a separate instance in early September, 5 million usernames and passwords appeared on a Russian forum (that information likely came from various earlier hacks, though). And in August, a security firm claimed to have found $1.2 billion credentials stolen by Russian hackers, though the firm’s report has been contested.

The issue with these dumps, even when they don’t involve services like Gmail or Dropbox, is the same: the danger of password reuse. If you always reuse the same password, a hacker doesn’t need to breach Google to obtain your Gmail password; instead, he can get it from your Fantasy Football forum. That’s why Facebook announced last week that it has been actively scouring sites that host dumped credentials to notify users if their password had been compromised.

Ahlberg and Donnelly warn that even more companies have probably been compromised, but those employees’ credentials have not been posted publicly.

“We have a pretty good coverage of the underbelly of the web, but these are just the public posts,” Donnelly said. “We’re highlighting how easy it is for somebody to just open the door and exploit a company because the information is sitting out there. But most certainly, there’s information that’s yet to be published.”


SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://mashable.com/

Healthcare finance tips for safeguarding against cyberattacks

cyber-attack caption

Premera hack puts renewed focus on securing sensitive healthcare info.

As Tuesday’s news about the Premera Blue Cross hack shows, healthcare organizations are vulnerable to cyberattacks, and the fix can be costly.

“The average Fortune 500 company budgets $44 million a year for security, including networking and all other aspects,” said Larry Ponemon, chairman of the Ponemon Institute, a research center focused on data security. “(Most) hospitals have less than a million to budget on cyber security.”

Already, at least two class action lawsuits have been brought against insurer Anthem, which saw a major data breach in January affect 80 million people. There’s also the cost to the health plan’s reputation and the logistics of notifying 80 million customers, Ponemon said. It’s still unknown what will come after 11 million people’s information was accesed in the Premera hack.

Until Anthem’s hack in January, high profile security breaches focused on large retailers such as Target and Home Depot.

This doesn’t mean healthcare organizations have been sitting on their hands believing it can’t happen to them, Ponemon said. A  survey of 91 healthcare organizations in 2013 showed that 90 percent experienced at least one data breach that year.

“Even if a hospital is reasonably secure, if may not be enough in this world,” he said.

Medical records are extremely valuable on the black market,  Ponemon said. They contain Social Security numbers, health ID numbers, addresses and possibly credit or debit card information – everything needed to create a fake identity.

“Basically it’s a rich data source for bad guys,” he said, such as terrorists seeking travel credentials.

The hackers may wait months and years before exploiting the data, he said.

“This is where we see the most serious ID theft crimes,” he said. “A lot of the 80 million will become identity theft victims.”

Ponemon was in the intelligence field for 45 years prior to founding the Ponemon Institute 14 years ago.

HITRUST, the Health Information Trust Alliance, works with healthcare organizations to improve their data security. It has partnered with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to conduct monthly briefings on cyber threats relevant to the healthcare industry, and to share best practices for defense and response.

HITRUST offers healthcare organizations a cyber threat alerting system of threats targeted at the industry. The C3 Alert is coordinated with the Healthcare and Public Health Sector and Government Coordinating Councils, according to HITRUST chief executive and founder Daniel Nutkis.

What hospitals can do:

  • As most security breaches are due to human error, maintain a good data structure to prevent data leakage, Ponemon said.
  • Encrypt data. The Wall Street Journal reported Anthem did not encrypt the personal data of its customers.
  • Ban the use of personal devices for storing patient information. Some doctors routinely send clinical records through personal e-mail, their own smartphones or tablets.
  • Rent a network intelligence system instead of buying one, Ponemon advises. It’s secure.
  • Collaborate with partners on exchanging information during and after a cyberattack, according to the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s 2014 “Draft Guide to Cyber Threat Information Sharing.” While this may seem counter-intuitive, providers need to  learn the types of systems and information being targeted and the techniques used to gain access.
  • Use standard data formats to facilitate interoperability and fast information exchanges, the NIST recommends.

SurveilStar is an ultimate employee monitoring software and parental control software which can help monitor computer activities and protect data security. You can also block files uploading and sharing to prevent data leakage. Including:

computer monitoring

  • View Real-time Screen Snapshot
  • Monitor Skype or Other Chat/IM Activity
  • Record Emails
  • Track web browsing history
  • Block access to any website
  • Remote PC Maintenance
  • Program Activity

 

If you would like to record and control all your children or employees’ activities on working PC, SurveilStar Monitoring would be your best choice.

A 30-day free trial version of this professional computer monitoring and tracking software is available. Feel free to download and try to check what your employees and children have done on PC.

Download

 

Reference: http://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/